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Rice on the Road

Sponsored by the Center for the Catholic Intellectual Tradition, Division of Mission & Identity

The Rice Lecture Series started in 2013, created to foster collaborative dialogue between Duquesne University and the Pittsburgh community, highlighting the expertise and knowledge of community residents, leaders, educators, activists, legislators, and entrepreneurs. Through entering Pittsburgh communities, we invite students and faculty to engage in a holistic and immersive learning experience, working in community to understand community. Through encouraging dialogue, the Rice Series seeks to advance collaborative cross-disciplinary work for social justice and honor values of solidarity in our own communities.

Rice on the Road invites you to join us each spring semester for our events. Events take place both in community and on-campus and involve a variety of community partners.

If you're interested in getting involved with Rice on the Road as a community partner, Duquesne faculty, staff member or student, or if you have a social justice issue you'd like to suggest, please email us at ccit@duq.edu .

Rice Fellows

The Rice Fellows Program supports collaborative work between an eligible Duquesne faculty, staff or graduate student and a community partner to address a specific project connected to the topics explore in our lecture series. Projects may focus on curricular, research or outreach opportunities. All Duquesne candidates are expected to attend a portion of the Rice Lecture Series and to apply to the program in concert with a community partner.

For more information, visit: Rice Fellows

In Honor of Msgr. Rice

Msg. Charles Owen RiceMsg. Rice with Rev. Martin Luther King

Monsignor Charles Owen Rice (1908-2005) studied at Duquesne University and St. Vincent's Seminary. He was ordained a priest in the Diocese of Pittsburgh in 1934. In 1937 Msgr. Rice helped to found the Catholic Radical Alliance and St. Joseph's House of Hospitality, a shelter for homeless men. Over the next seven decades he was active in the labor, civil rights, and antiwar movements. For many years, Msgr. Rice was a radio commentator and wrote a column for Pittsburgh Catholic. He came to be known as Pittsburgh's "Labor Priest." Msgr. Rice was pastor at St. Anne's Church in Castle Shannon.

The Rice Lecture Series is possible thanks to the generosity of the McGinley Endowment.