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Fall 2018 Courses

 All classes are 3 credits unless otherwise noted

AFST 101: Elementary Swahili
MWF  3:00 - 3:50  FISHER 631  Christy, W.

Fundamentals of oral and written Swahili. Focus on development of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, and culture. Special emphasis on oral communication.

  • Cross lists with: MLKI 101 Elementary Kiswahili
AFST 102: Swahili II
MWF  2:00 - 2:50  FISHER 629  Christy, W.

Continued study of the Fundamentals of oral and written Swahili. Building upon the reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, established in Elementary Swahili.

  • Cross list with: MLKI 102, Elementary Swahili II - Modern Language.
  • Fulfills Core Language
AFST 150: Introduction to African Stdies
TR  10:50 - 12:05  FISHER 442  Boodoo, G.

This course will present inter/multi-disciplinary perspectives on sub-Saharan Africa paying attention to the many factors -society, politics, economics, culture, literature, religion, ecology, among others- that have shaped the region and impact its role in our world today.

  • Fulfills Theme Area: Global Diversity
AFST 202: Women and Christianity
W  6:00 - 8:40  COLLGH 223  Vasko, E.

In this class we will be placing the received wisdom of the Christian religion in conversation with the ways in which it has been interpreted both by the tradition's dominant narrative as well as by women and men who challenge that narrative across generations and cultures. Emphasis will be placed on multicultural perspectives in light of issues and themes that engage feminist theologians, womanist theologians, and scholars from the Circle of Concern African Women Theologians. Some of the topics that will be discussed include: sexual violence, racism, poverty and health, ways of imaging the divine and participating in religious rituals, interpretive and communal authority, and power structures. The goal of this course is to expand our worldview by considering the lives of women in diverse religious communities and to think constructively and creatively about visions and strategies that promote the flourishing of women and all persons. Through this requirement students are assisted in learning how to be informed global citizens and challenged to take responsibility for promoting human dignity.

  • Cross lists with: THEO 201, WSGS 202
  • Fulfills Theme Area: Social Justice
AFST 240: Bioethics:African Perspectives
TBA Osuji, P.

This course introduces students to African cultures and to alternative approaches in bioethics discourse. It explores theoretical as well as practical issues in the field of bioethics from the African perspectives. The course intends to make students appreciate non-Western perspectives, thus equipping them for discourse on global bioethical issues. Subjects covered include: sources of African ethics; the Role of Community in African Bioethics; Relational autonomy in informed consent (RAIC); The care of earth and environment in African worldview; issues at beginning of life; and end-of-life questions.

  • Fullfills Theme Areas: Social Justice
  • Cross Lists with HCE 240
AFST 251C: African History
MWF  1:00 - 1:50  FISHER 631  Chapdelaine, R.

This course examines some of the various peoples of Africa over the past 500 years, but with an emphasis on the modern era. While the focus will be on cultures and cultural developments, economic conditions and political situations will also be studied.

  • Must be enrolled in one of the following Colleges: McAnulty Colg-Grad Schl Arts
  • Must be enrolled in one of the following Classifications: Freshman
AFST 264: Religion and Global Conflict
TR   925 - 10:40  FISHER 631  Scheid, A.

This course begins with a historical overview of Christian approaches towards pacifism and war, exploring why the use of lethal force has been a perennial moral problem within the Christian tradition. It then turns its attention to contemporary debates about whether or when war is ever morally justified. Contemporary approaches to post-conflict resolution may also receive some attention.

  • Fulfills Theme Area: Faith and Reason; Social Justice
AFST 281C: African Religions
MWF  11:00 - 11:50  FISHER 609  Uzukwu, E.

This course is usually offered as a study abroad course in the Maymester program. It explores indigenous, traditional and contemporary African religious expressions and belief systems with special attention to the particular location in which the course is situated. Through assigned readings and engagement with select African religious rituals and practices, this course seeks to give greater insight and understanding into the reasoning, practices and expressions of African religions.

  • Course limited to Liberal Arts incoming freshmen registering in the Africa Learning Community
  • Cross lists with: THEO 264
AFST 304: Hist of Human Trfckng in Glbl
MW  3:00 - 4:15  COLLGH 225  Chapdelaine, R.

This course will survey the social, economic, political and cultural conditions that enable human trafficking. From the Trans-Atlantic slave trade to current day human trafficking, issues relating to the illegal transfer of men, women and children throughout the world will be analyzed. During this course students will gain a better understanding of specific terms, such as modern day slavery, child labor, forced labor, smuggling and sex slavery. The material presented will also offer an understanding of how race, class and gender are useful tools by which to understand human trafficking as a global phenomenon.

AFST 323: Environmental Justice
TR  9:25 - 10:40  COLLGH 640  Chitiyo, P.

This course will examine how meaningful and fair treatment of people, despite their different backgrounds, race, or culture, can help to protect them and their environment from environmental hazards. We live in a globalized world where people are more interconnected than before and are engaged in different enterprises across the globe. There is therefore, a need for environmental justice in order to protect natural resources, human health, and promote sustainability. The importance of environmental justice, what is being done, and how it is linked to sustainability will also be discussed.

  • Cross lists with: ENVI 323
  • Fulfills Theme Area: Social Justice; Global Diversity 
AFST 431: African Studies Internship
TBA  Boodoo, G.

This internship is an approved un-paid work experience, related to the topic of African Studies. Students are responsible for identifying internship opportunities, and will work at the internship site under the direction of a site supervisor.

Students must receive approval from the director of the Center for African Studies.

AFST 495: Directed Readings (1-3 Credits)
TBA  FISHER DEPT  Boodoo, G.

Offers the opportunity for students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic or area in African Studies.

Requires permission of the Center's Director

  • University Core Writing Intensive

Spring 2018

AFST 101 - Elementary Swahili:
(MWF 2:00-2:50pm)

Fundamentals of oral and written Swahili. Focus on development of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, and culture. Special emphasis on oral communication.

AFST 150 - Introduction to African Studies:
(Online, Prof. Plaxedes Chitiyo) 

This course will present inter/multi-disciplinary perspectives on sub-Saharan Africa paying attention to the many factors -society, politics, economics, culture, literature, religion, ecology, among others- that have shaped the region and impact its role in our world today

Theme Area: Global Diversity

AFST 209 - African Philosophy:
(MWF 11:00am-11:50am, Rockwell 301, Prof. Okechukwu Njoku)

This course explores how philosophers in Africa examine religion, culture, morality, wisdom, and social justice. It examines various kinds of sages and their views of God, culture, life and death, and humans and animals. This course uses philosophical texts, novels, visual arts, and film.

Theme Area: Global Diversity

AFST 245 - Disabilities Across the World: Search for Dignity:
(TR 1:40pm-2:55pm, Fisher 400, Prof. Megan Overby)

This course challenges students to consider individuals with disabilities within the context of social justice and dignity. The course focuses on how disabilities are perceived across the world's cultures and societies, the consequences of those perceptions, and the historical, political, and economic forces which perpetuate them. The goals and missions of some of the agencies and movements dedicated to addressing disabilities across the globe are explored. Through large class discussions, book readings, videos, and individual assignments, students engage in self-reflection about their personal assumptions and beliefs about individuals with disabilities as well as the ethical problems these assumptions bring to our social interactions with other people. Several classes will be conducted online through Blackboard, using Discussion Board and/or Collaborate as the learning platform.

Theme Area: Social Justice

AFST 251 - African History:
(TR 1:40pm-2:55pm, College Hall 553, Prof. Robin Chapdelaine)

This course examines some of the various peoples of Africa over the past 500 years, but with an emphasis on the modern era. While the focus will be on cultures and cultural developments, economic conditions and political situations will also be studied.

Theme Area: Global Diversity

AFST 324 - Cultural Appl in Clin Practice:
(W 1:00pm-3:50pm, Fisher 555, Prof Cynthia Walters)

This course introduces models of transcultural health care. Issues to the health care professional's role in the delivery of culturally competent based health care are explored. Emphasis is placed on the assessment and analysis of culturally congruent care as related to clinical practice issues in the United States and Globally and more specifically in the context of sub-Saharan Africa. Interplay between models of transcultural care and other models of clinical application of culturally appropriate interventions are examined.

Theme Area: Global Diversity

AFST 335 - Psyc, Ident & Flm: Prsp Afr Cn:
(TR 12:15pm-1:30pm, Canevin 306, Prof. Suzanne Barnard)

In this course, we will explore African and African Diasporic writings and films that address questions of identity in contemporary post-colonial, de-colonial, and global contexts. Our approach to understanding identity construction in these contexts will be fundamentally interdisciplinary. We will read texts on identity and film across the disciplines of psychology, philosophy, African studies, post-colonial and de-colonial theory, anthropology, cultural studies, literature, and film theory. We will also screen and engage films on their own aesthetic terms - that is, as art forms that offer media-specific possibilities for producing identities.

Theme Area: Creative Arts, Social Justice

AFST 495 - Directed Readings:
(TBA, Prof. Gerald Boodoo)

Offers the opportunity for students to conduct in-depth study of a particular topic or area in African Studies. Requires permission of the Center's Director.

For more information please contact the Center at africanstudies@duq.edu