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William M. Wright IV, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts
Department of Theology

622 Fisher Hall
Phone: 412.396.5473

Education:

Ph.D., Religion (New Testament), Emory University, 2005
M.T.S., Theology, University of Notre Dame, 2001
B.A., History, Baldwin-Wallace College, 1999
Expertise

Dr. Wright is a biblical scholar and theologian. His area of specialization is the New Testament, especially the Johannine Writings. His research interests include the use of Greco-Roman compositional rhetoric in the Gospel literature, the reception of the Old Testament in the New, and the history of biblical interpretation as a resource for contemporary exegesis and theology in light of Catholic Ressourcement theology.  [See Biblical Reception History at Duquesne].

Dr. Wright also interested in theological Interpretation of Scripture and in the relationship between biblical exegesis and Catholic theology.

He is the author of Rhetoric and Theology: Figural Reading of John 9 (de Gruyter 2009) and the co-author, with Fr. Francis Martin, of The Gospel of John volume in the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture Series (Baker Academic, forthcoming).His articles have appeared in Catholic Biblical Quarterly, The Thomist, and Nova et Vetera.



Teaching

Undergraduate: Biblical and Historical Perspectives; Introduction to the New Testament

MA:  Introduction to the New Testament

Ph.D Seminar:  THEO 619: New Testament Seminar

Scholarship

Rhetoric and Theology: Figural Reading of John 9. BZNW 165.

Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 2009.


This monograph on John 9 makes extensive use of premodern Christian exegesis as a resource for New Testament studies. The study reframes the existing critique of the two-level reading of John 9 as allegory in terms of premodern exegetical practices. It offers a hermeneutical critique of the two-level reading strategy as a kind of figural exegesis, rather than historical reconstruction, through an extensive comparison with Augustine's interpretation of John 9. A review of several premodern Christian readings of John 9 suggests an alternative way of understanding this account in terms of Greco-Roman rhetoric. John 9 resembles the rhetorical argumentation associated with chreia elaboration and the complete argument to display Jesus' identity as the light of the world. This analysis illustrates the inseparability of form and content, rhetoric and theology, in the Fourth Gospel.

Articles:

"Pre-Gospel Traditions and Post-Critical Interpretation in Benedict XVI's Jesus of Nazareth, Volume 2," Nova et Vetera 10 (2012): 1015-1027.

"Patristic Biblical Hermeneutics in Joseph Ratzinger's Jesus of Nazareth," Letter and Spirit 7 (2012): 193-209.

"The Literal Sense of Scripture according to Henri de Lubac: Insights from Patristic Exegesis of the Transfiguration." Modern Theology 28 (2012): 252-277.

"Hearing the Shepherd's Voice: The Paroimia of the Good Shepherd Discourse and Augustine's Figural Reading." Journal of Theological Interpretation (2012).

"Pre-Gospel Traditions and Post-Critical Interpretation in Benedict XVI's Jesus of Nazareth: Volume 2," Nova et Vetera 10 (2012): 1015-1027.

"Patristic Biblical Hermeneutics in Joseph Ratzinger's Jesus of Nazareth," Letter and Spirit 7 (2012): 193-209.

"Jesus' Identity and the Use of Scripture in John 6:1-21." Josephinum Journal of Theology 17 (2010): 24-40.

"'A New Synthesis': Joseph Ratzinger's Jesus of Nazareth." Nova et Vetera. English Edition 7 (2009): 35-66.

"Greco-Roman Character Typing and the Presentation of Judas in the Fourth Gospel." The Catholic Biblical Quarterly 71 (2009): 544-559.

"The Theology of Disclosure and Biblical Exegesis," The Thomist 70 (2006): 395-419.