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2015 Human Rights Film Series

 

 

White Like Me: Race, Racism & White Privilege in America (2013)

White Like Me, based on the work of acclaimed anti-racist educator and author Tim Wise, explores race and racism in the US through the lens of whiteness and white privilege. In a stunning reassessment of the American ideal of meritocracy and claims that we've entered a post-racial society, Wise offers a fascinating look back at the race-based white entitlement programs that built the American middle class, and argues that our failure as a society to come to terms with this legacy of white privilege continues to perpetuate racial inequality and race-driven political resentments today.  For years, Tim Wise's bestselling books and spellbinding lectures have challenged some of our most basic assumptions about race in America. White Like Me is the first film to bring the full range of his work to the screen -- to show how white privilege continues to shape individual attitudes, electoral politics, and government policy in ways too many white people never stop to think about.

(Source: Media Education Foundation, http://www.mediaed.org/whitelikeme/)

 
Power & Control (2010)

With the recent US economic collapse, domestic violence statistics show a sharp increase in violence against women around the country. States are closing shelters and cutting programs. Yet the mainstream media ignores domestic violence, except when there are celebrity incidents, (OJ, Rihanna, Charlie Sheen, Mel Gibson, etc . In the meantime, more spouses have been killed by their partners in the past several years than soldiers have been killed in Iraq.  Power and Control is a documentary film that addresses a life and death issue during a time of urgent crisis. The film is a timely and comprehensive exploration of physical and emotional abuse in our society, as refracted through the story of Kim Mosher, a Duluth, MN mother of three.

(Source: Official film site, http://www.powerandcontrolfilm.com/)

 

 

Fed Up (2014)

Thirty years ago the U.S. Government issued its first ever dietary guidelines and with it one of the greatest health epidemics of our time ensued. In her documentary feature debut, executive producer and narrator Katie Couric joins Laurie David (An Inconvenient Truth), Regina Scully (The Invisible War) and Stephanie Soechtig (Tapped) to explore why, despite media attention and government policies to combat childhood obesity, generations of kids will now live shorter lives than their parents. Upending the conventional wisdom of why we gain weight and how to lose it, Fed Up unearths the dirty little secret the food industry doesn't want you to know- far more of us are sick from what we are eating than anyone has ever realized. The truth is, only 30% of people suffering from diet-related diseases are actually obese; while 70% of us - even those of us who look thin and trim on the outside - are facing the same consequences, fighting the same medical battles as the obese among us...Fed Up lays bare a decades long misinformation campaign orchestrated by Big Food and aided and abetted by the U.S. Government.

(Source: Official film site, http://fedupmovie.com/#/page/home)

 

Not My Life (2011)

Not My Life is the first film to depict the cruel and dehumanizing practices of human trafficking and modern slavery on a global scale. Filmed on five continents, in a dozen countries, Not My Life takes viewers into a world where millions of children are exploited, every day, through an astonishing array of practices including forced labor, domestic servitude, begging, sex tourism, sexual violence, and child soldiering. "Human traffickers are earning billions of dollars on the backs and in the beds of our children," says the film's director, Academy Award nominee, Robert Bilheimer, "and yet no one knows this is happening." We have a huge responsibility, right now, to learn the truth and act on it. Challenging though it may be, Not My Life's message is ultimately one of hope. Victims of slavery can be set free and go on to live happy and productive lives. Those who advocate for slavery victims are growing in numbers, and are increasingly effective.

(Source: Official film site: http://notmylife.org/)

 

The Fourth World (2011)

There's a hidden world out there that is getting ready to explode: The world of slums. A seething mass of humanity--1 billion people--inhabits this hidden world and if the United Nations is right--that number could triple in the years to come. Who are these people and what are these slums? Are they a danger? A menace? Or are slums a breeding ground for entrepreneurs? A transition point for people on a desperate journey from poverty to middle-class respectability? The Fourth World takes you inside slums on three continents to meet individuals caught up in the largest people migration in the history of the world. Understanding 'a billion people' is almost impossible, but meeting a handful of slum dwellers strips away the statistic and begins the process of building understanding. Journey with the filmmakers to Guatemala, Kenya and the Philippines to meet slum dwellers. The stories are real. The implications of turning a blind eye to this situation are real. We ignore this at our own peril. |

(Source: Official film site: http://www.fourthworldfilm.com/)

 

 

#ReGeneration (2010)

The award-winning documentary film, #ReGENERATION, explores the galvanizing forces behind the Occupy Movement and the state of social activism in our society. The film takes an uncompromising look at the challenges facing today's youth and young adults as they attempt to engage on a myriad of social and political issues. Focused on how our education, parenting, and media can influence us, the film follows three separate walks of life representing today's generation. Each brings their own unique perspective - from an inspired collective of musicians working outside the corporate system, to a twenty-something conservative family about to welcome the birth of their second child, and a group of five high-school students from the suburbs looking for their place in society. Their stories are interspersed with the knowledge, wisdom, and personal reflections of some of the country's leading scholars, social activists, and media. The film explores how today's generation approaches activism, how it is impacted by technology, our disconnection with nature and history, our consumer culture, and the economic factors holding many of us back from becoming more active participants in our communities. Through a diverse and intelligent series of stories, interviews and insights, we come to a deeper understanding of the influences shaping our society.

(Source: Official film site, http://cargocollective.com/regeneration)