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Spring 2018

All classes are 3 credits unless otherwise noted

IR 102 Careers in IR - 1 cr.  (W 3:00-3:50) - SAWICKI

This course is intended to introduce the new IR major to fundamental logistics of a career in International Relations generally and the IR program at Duquesne University specifically. It will cover professional and academic elements, review internship processes and outline study abroad options. Further it will provide a stepping stone to the IR advisement process, career options with the major and help students focus on setting and achieving career goals after graduation.

IR 104 Elementary Arabic II for IR  (TR 10:50-12:05) - PETERSON

A continuation of IR 103 with additional emphasis to the four language skills and appropriate lexicon for students of IR.

IR 110 Current Problems in International Politics (TR 3:05-4:20) - HAAS

A survey of issues that states currently face in world politics.  Theme Area: Social Justice

IR 120 International Political Economy  (TR 1:40-2:55) - SAWICKI

An introduction to how government decisions about trade, investment, debt and market developments impact people domestically and worldwide. Special attention is given to the problems experienced by poorer countries and responsibilities of developed nations. No background in the subject matter is required.

IR 200-01 Writing and Research in IR (TR 9:25-10:40) - SPANGENBERG

Students will learn to do research and write papers related to IR issues.

IR 206-55 Japanese Culture (online) - RUSHLANDER

Broad overview of cultural and social topics including social aspects, ethics, and values of the Japanese society. (Taught in English).

IR 206-56 Japanese Culture (online) - RUSHLANDER

Broad overview of cultural and social topics including social aspects, ethics, and values of the Japanese society. (Taught in English).

IR 207 Arab Culture (MWF 11:00-11:50) - SURREY

This course will engage students in the study of a variety of literary, linguistic, geographical, historical, social, religious, cultural and artistic aspects of the modern Arab world. Many course components are specifically intended to heighten students' sensitivity to racial bias and sharpen awareness of multicultural issues. The course intends to increase tolerance and understanding by providing students with a realistic view of the cultural contours of the modern Arab world and the richness of the Arab cultural heritage. (Taught in English).

IR 209 Politics of Emerging Powers (TR 1:40-2:55) - BOB

An introduction to government, politics, culture, and economic policy in the developing world.

IR 222 Intelligence & Foreign Policy (MWF 9:00-9:50) - LEBEAU

The Central Intelligence Agency has at times been in step with American policy and at other times (in Cuba in the 1960's and in Afghanistan, 2001) seemed to drive it. The course will look at the CIA through the eyes of the individuals chosen to lead it, from Allen Dulles to Stansfield Turner and, in an age of transnational threats, from George Tenant to the tenure of John Brennan. The course will also explore the relationship between the various CIA Directors and the presidents they served.  Cross-listed with POSC 222

IR 245 International Relations (TR 12:15-1:30) - SCHULZE

A study of politics between states including sovereignty, balance of power, war, and economics.

IR 251 African History (TR 1:40-2:55) - CHAPDELAINE

This course examines some of the various peoples of Africa over the past 500 years, but with an emphasis on the modern era. While the focus will be on cultures and cultural developments, economic conditions and political situations will also be studied.

IR 291 History of Japan (TR 10:50-12:05) - LI

This is a survey of Japanese history from antiquity to the present time. Examined are origins of the Japanese nation, the interplay between indigenous elements and outside influences in the making of Japanese culture and institutions, challenges of the modern age and Japanese reactions, militarism and imperialism, the "miracle" of post-war economic recovery and growth, as well as the ongoing dialogue between traditional and modernity in a rapidly changing world.

IR 295 War & Peace in Nuclear Age (TR 9:25-10:40) - SAWICKI

An examination of the interaction between politics and the use of force in the nuclear age.

IR 300 Intelligence, Covert Action, and Counter-Insurgency (MWF 1:00-1:50) - LEBEAU

Covert action operations and counter-intelligence have been employed in counter-insurgency from the 1600's to the present global struggle against terrorism. The same forms of low intensity conflict are being fought in Afghanistan and the Middle East. This course will survey counter-insurgency doctrine and analyze the value and problems intelligence operations present in these types of conflicts.

IR 303 Politics of Immigration (TR 10:50-12:05) - SCHULZE

This course explores the challenges of immigrant incorporation in an increasingly transnational world. Through comparative case studies drawn from the European and American contexts, as well as community engaged learning activities with Pittsburgh partner institutions, students gain both a theoretical and practical exposure to the difficulties that both immigrant groups and policymakers face regarding immigrant incorporation.

IR 326 German Foreign Policy (MWF 11:00-11:50) - LEBEAU

This course surveys the transformation of German political aspirations from the ascendancy of Kaiser Wilhelm II to the disintegration of Imperial Germany following defeat in the First World War in 1918. The rise of Adolf Hitler in the Weimar Republic resulted in the ascendancy of the Nazi movement in 1933 and its complete collapse in 1945. The course will trace the growth of Germany as the economic powerhouse of Europe in the post-war age, and the pivotal roles of chancellors Konrad Adenauer, Willi Brandt, Helmut Kohl and Angela Merkel in the development - and the problems - of the European Union.  Cross-listed with POSC 315

IR 353 United Nations III - 2 crs. (TR 4:25-5:40) - AMSTER

Examines the processes and policies of the United Nations through classroom lecture and experiential (lab) activities. A strong focus will be placed on reinforcing professional skills such as research, negotiation, and public speaking. The required lab portion of this course will consist of student participation in all parts of local and/or national Model United Nations conferences, amounting to at least 12 hours of this lab/activity outside the classroom.  Permission of instructor required.

IR 354 United Nations III - 2 crs. (TR 4:25-5:40) - AMSTER

Examines the processes and policies of the United Nations through classroom lecture and experiential (lab) activities. A strong focus will be placed on reinforcing professional skills such as research, negotiation, and public speaking. The required lab portion of this course will consist of student participation in all parts of local and/or national Model United Nations conferences, amounting to at least 12 hours of this lab/activity outside the classroom.  Permission of instructor required.

IR 360 Crisis Management in Complex Emergencies (W 6:00-8:40) - SAWICKI

This course considers crisis management in theory and practice, drawing from the period since World War II. Theories of crisis prevention, escalation, management, de-escalation, termination, and post-crisis management will be covered. In addition, alternative decision-making theories, structures and processes, the nature of crisis bargaining and negotiation and the role of third parties will be addressed. Special attention will be paid to the role of military force to post-Cold War crisis scenarios. The course will include case studies and a simulation designed to provide context to the study of crisis management.

IR 374 Vietnam Era (W 6:00-8:40) - RODRIGUES

The purpose of this course is to create awareness among students of the significance of the Vietnam War in the recent history of the United States. Although the war is over thirty years old, its legacy has loomed over American foreign policy, American consciousness, and the American psyche since its happening.

IR 394 Historical Geography (M 6:00-8:40) - TRIMARCHI

A survey of the physical world which is the basis for a human civilization, past, present, and future. What are the possibilities and limitations of different places for human development? How successful or unsuccessful were human settlements? Emphasis also on geography as an intellectual discipline and cultural phenomenon.

IR 401 American Presidents and the Constitution (MW 3:00-4:15) - GORMLEY/ALLEN

A study of American Presidents and the Constitution.

IR 432 Network Situational Awareness (T 6:00-8:40) - SHICK

The 21st century created an unprecedented dependence on the Internet that is ever changing and affects all aspects of business and communications. This change brings up challenging problems which business decisions analysts face both at the micro and macro-level. Students will use a variety of software to identify and analyze network communications to solve challenge problems. There will be a heavy focus on the threats facing organizations along with general network profiling techniques. Although there is no prerequisite, students should have a firm grasp on RFC-compliant communications since this class will only lightly cover certain topics.

IR 453W Trends in Latin American Literature (MW 5:00-6:15) - CALAHORRANO

Major movements and representative works from Pre-Columbian period to the present.

IR 488W China and the West (T 6:00-8:40) - LI

This course explores China's encounters with the West from early times through the modern age, with an emphasis on cultural exchanges. It opens with a survey of Chinese history and Sino-Western interactions over time and then focuses on topics such as the Silk Road, the Chinese Empire and the Philosophies, Christianity in China, American influence and Chinese liberalism, Marxism and Chinese communist revolution, Chinese culture in the West and Western presence in China today.

IR 499 Advanced International Relations Theory (MW 3:00-4:15) - VUJICIC

The central substantive aim of the course is to develop a deep and nuanced understanding of how different theories explain international politics and which ones are most persuasive under what conditions. Theories are important because they affect both how we interpret our environment and how we respond to it. Theories, in short, drive action. Theories representing all of the major approaches to the study of world politics (material, institutional, and ideational) and levels of analysis (international, domestic, and individual) will be examined. A central objective of the class is for students to develop their critical reading abilities, i.e., what are the authors read in the class arguing? What are the strengths and weaknesses of each piece? What are the authors' (often hidden) assumptions? Correctly answering these questions is important not only in the context of this class, but in terms of how you - current citizens and future leaders - see the world.

IR 491 Internship - LUCENTE/SPANGEBERG

Permission of IR directors required.

IR 493W Directed Readings - LEBEAU

An opportunity for selected students to engage in independent study and research.  Permission of IR directors required.

IR 901 Villa Nazareth - LUCENTE

Duquesne still maintains in Rome its first (since 1985) study abroad/exchange program: DU/Villa Nazareth. For decades, this program has served, in both Italian and English, DU students in all disciplines. Presently, it is only for the majors in International Relations. The cost of the DU/VN program includes tuition/fees, room/board, public transportation in the city of Rome, as well as a few excursions throughout Italy. Students are responsible for their round trip airfare, course material, and personal miscellanea.

Dr. Carla Lucente is the director of the DU/Villa Nazareth program. For more information, please email IR@duq.edu

Updated 1/3/2018