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Career Paths

Graduates of Peace, Justice, and Conflict Resolution are working in international aid and development impositions such as:
  • Regional Advisor for Catholic Relief Services
  • Deputy Country Manager for World Vision
  • Program officer for Family Health International, and the Center for Disease Control
Graduates have obtained management positions such as:
  • Project manager for NASA
  • Consultant in program management
  • Manager for the International Rescue Committee
  • Program officer in the United Nations Development Program

Graduates are Training Professionals in conflict resolution, or are teaching at universities. Others have taken positions in labor-union-organizing and as corporate-compliance officers.

Conflict resolution is an expanding field. Opportunities include:

  • School peer-mediation (useful together with teacher certification).
  • Intercultural communication and diplomacy; race relations.
  • Federal or state government alternative dispute resolution programs, such as the Federal Mediation & Conciliation Service.
  • University or corporate dispute resolution offices.
  • International Non-Governmental and Inter-governmental Organizations, including the World Bank’s Post-Conflict Unit, that do international peace-building,  humanitarian, and development work.
  • For-profit dispute mediation groups (often useful together with a law degree).
  • Policy research.
  • Legislative lobbying, petitioning and protest action. and public education.
  • University offices that handle conflict, such as the Dean of Students office.
  • Peace-building specialists within US or inter-governmental relief and development organizations (prior experience via internships and language skills).
  • The restorative justice field, including non-profit organizations, justice, or social service departments.
  • Consulting about conflict, conflict assessment and forecasting.
  • Multinational corporations and private investment firms concerned about conflict.
  • Environmental and public-policy conflicts.
  • Facilitation and dialogue.