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News & Events

Each year the department hosts a number of events and activities from regional conferences on modern language scholarship and international literatures, to theatrical and musical presentations, as well as the University's Annual Human Rights Film Series. Click the links below to learn more about past and upcoming events:

Fall 2017 Events:

El Dia de los Muertos

The Day of the Dead is an ancient tradition celebrated in all of Latin America from October to November.  Families remember their departed loved ones and celebrate their lives.  Please be sure to join us for this unique holiday! We will have a craft-making workshop, a discussion in Spanish, and a communal altar installation!  

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

Army Corps of Engineers Discussion

On Wednesday, September the 27th, Dr. Lucía Osa-Melero and Carmen Alicia Martínez from the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, were invited as guest speakers to the Army Corps of Engineers in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month. Their talk focused on their community-engaged program Reading to Play Playing to Read and its benefits to the Hispanic community and the Duquesne Spanish majors and minors. 

    

"Latinos Beyond Reel: Challenging a Media Stereotype"

On Tuesday, October 3rd, at 7pm, we will be continuing the celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month with a screening of Latinos Beyond Reel: Challenging a Media Stereotype.  There will be a brief presentation and discussion to follow the screening.  

Spring 2017 Events:


"Reading to Play and Playing to Read"

Continuing the tradition, students in MLSP 302W (Spanish Conversation and Composition II) and MLSP 280 (Spanish for Healthcare Professionals) and students from Beechwood Elementary School presented a play of the "Reading to Play and Playing to Read" at the Libermann Hall on April 11 as part of Duquesne's community-engagement programs. The play was guided by Professors Dr. Lucia Osa-Melero and Carmen Martinez.

         

Big Read Kick-Off Event

Taiko drumming by the Pittsburgh Taiko and the Japanese folk songs by Keiko Rushlander along with the special Children's Chorus gave a lively performance at the Genesius Theater on 3-16.

                    

Faculty Spotlight

Our department was thrilled to learn that Professors of Dr. Lucia Osa-Melero and Carmen Martinez received this year's Creative Teaching Award from CTE for their project "Reading to Play, Playing to Read" in partnership with Casa San José. Their dedication has enriched the academic scope of the department and the learning experience of our students. It has also benefited our community partner, Casa San José, and its effort to provide a safe, constructive and beneficial framework for the integration of its member families into a new and different environment. Congratulations!

Big Read Movie Night "Farewell to Manzanar"

                                        

Movie night on 3-22 at Student Union: screening of the 1976 film Farewell to Manzanar, a story based on the memoir of Jeanne Wakatsuki and her family during their imprisonment at the Manzanar concentration camp.

I thought the movie provided valuable insight into the lives of Japanese-Americans post-pearl harbor. I found myself thinking throughout the movie what makes someone American. In the opening scenes Jeanne Wakatsuki, the narrator briefly talks about her family. She says, her grandmother is the only one that can still speak Japanese and her family has adopted American customs more so than there Japanese heritage. After the pearl-harbor attack the viewer finds her father burning pictures and most importantly, the Japanese flag which represents the destruction of her Japanese culture in order to assimilate to American culture in order to stay safe from persecution. I feel that Jeanne's family is as American as anyone but because of her physical attributes she was seen as the enemy. After watching the film, I still ask myself what it means to be American if, after assimilating into American culture, Jeanne's family still faced persecution.                ~by Jordan Chaplin, School of Business

Big Read Project

Duquesne University is one of just 77 non-profits selected to receive a National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) grant to host a Big Read project. The Big Read project invites readers from the Duquesne University community and the public to participate in reading J.Otsuka's "When the Emperor Was Divine."
University Librarian Dr. Sara Baron states that "This award gives Duquesne an opportunity to host a series of events related to When the Emperor Was Divine. Book discussions will spark conversations about the novel's themes, both looking back at a historically turbulent time in America as well as examining the world today. Together, we will read this book to broaden our understanding of our world, our communities and ourselves." As part of the project, various educational and cultural events and activities relevant to the novel such as a Haiku Workshop, an Origami Workshop and a Japanese tea ceremony. The author Ms.Otsuka will visit campus on March 30 to discuss her book. A detailed list of the program's events is available at http://guides.library.duq.edu/BigRead/events. 

                                

Haiku Workshop on 2-15                                             Tea Cremony with Mrs.Yoko Motoyama on 2-28

Reflections:

I think that a benefit of the Haiku conventions is the restrictions that it puts on the poem itself. The Haiku poem forces the writer to pick a specific topic and include specific language in each line. I enjoyed the confinements that this format placed on my writing. Every word needed to be strategically chosen. Every syllable counts when you have a limited number to work with. Haiku poems give the writer an opportunity to sit back and think about the relationship between man and nature. Waka poems, similar to Haikus, are traditionally about nature and the changing seasons. This exercise was a great moment for me to sit back and think about the nature surrounding me. Here in America, we tend to be too busy to stop and smell the roses. I enjoyed writing a waka poem for a class assignment. I felt that the strict lines I needed to follow within the structure of a waka poem forced me to really think about what I wanted to say and what words were most important to include.                                                                                                                                        ~ by Regina Sandora, School of Education

The aspect that strikes me the most is the silence that occurs during the tea ceremony. Throughout the whole process of the tea ceremony, the important things are conveyed without words by actions. Initially, I believed that the tea ceremony would be filled with conversion, but the tea ceremony seems to be a time of reflections and mediation for both the guest and the host. The guest learns about the host by his actions and not by his words.                                                    ~by Kevin Ngo, School of Pharmacy

The aspect of the tea ceremony that strikes me the most is when you crawl through the small entrance, Nijiriguchi, to enter the tea room. This signifies that you are forgetting your pride at the door and bowing down low in a matter of respect upon entering the tea room. I thought this part of the ceremony was most striking because I would not have thought to associate the small door with respect.

                                                                          ~ by Maria Corigliano, School of Business

Students of Japanese Culture, 206-55 taught by Ms.Keiko Rushlander, have been taking part in this unique project during the Spring semester.   

"Reading to Play, Playing to Read" made it on the ACTFL homepage!

The program has been recognized as globally engaged through the ACTFL Global Engagement Initiative review process in 2016. Please check out the website below.

https://www.actfl.org/about-the-american-council-the-teaching-foreign-languages/actfl-global-engagement-initiative/recognized-global-engagement-initiative-programs

Human Rights Film Series is held from January 18 to February 23

The department is privileged to serve as the organizer of the University's annual Human Rights Film Series, which is held in January and February. The series showcases award-winning documentaries and feature films dealing with the some of the most pressing human rights issues confronting the world today.

Featuring the award-winning films focusing on some of the most critical human rights issues of our times. Presentations by experts and opinion leaders. All screening held at 7:00 p.m. in 105 College Hall.

Fall 2016 Events:

Community Engagement in Spanish Conversation and Composition I Course

                       

Continuing the tradition, students in Spanish Conversation and Composition I completed their first community-engagement activity "Niños y Niñas Bilingües" at YMCA-Duquesne. Dr. Lucía Osa-Melero guided her students, working cooperatively in pairs, to educate preschoolers on the value of a second language.

• This year, Duquesne students customized a lesson plan to teach colors, numbers, air animals, land animals and parts of the body to the young preschoolers.

• In line with the Día de los Muertos event, students created lesson plans that compared the Halloween celebration in the USA to the Día de los Muertos festivities in Latin America and parts of the USA.

• A new aspect this year is the direct communication with the preschoolers' parents. After each lesson, students left a brief audio message to the parents summarizing the content of the lesson while making an emphasis on the pronunciation of relevant words, such as calabaza (pumpkin); calavera (skull); and esqueleto (skeleton).

• Teachers, parents and preschoolers involved in the YMCA-Duquesne project highly valued the activity and are requesting more lessons for the Spring semester.

• This project was supported by the YMCA Duquesne Early Development Center and the Community Engagement Teaching and Research Center (CETR).

A series of films will be presented by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, co-sponsored by with the McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts and the Office of Multicultural Affairs to celebrate the new wave of Ibero-American cinema. Upcoming films include:                                           Spanish Film Club

Guaraní - November 2 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 105, College Hall

                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

Guarani Movie PosterLuis Zorraquín / Argentina, Paraguay / 85 min / 2015 / Guaraní and Spanish with English subtitles

A heartfelt story, Guaraní follows fisherman Atilio as he travels with his granddaughter Iara to Buenos Aires. Directed by talent to watch Luis Zorraquín, Guaraní features an outstanding script. Part road movie and part coming-of-age drama, the film portrays two generations of Paraguayans whose views of the world seem centuries apart.

Pequenas Mentiras Piadosas (The Travel agent) - October 26 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 105, College Hall

Travel Agent PosterNiccolò Bruna / Spain, Italy / 87 min / 2015 / Spanish with English subtitles

From her tiny office overlooking the U.S. Interests Section, 58-year old Lourdes counsels thousands of Cubans seeking a U.S. travel visa. She coaches them on answering tricky questions, fine-tuning their stories so they have a better chance of succeeding. 

Todos se van (Everybody Leaves) - November 9 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 105, College Hall

Todos se Van PosterSergio Cabrera / Colombia/ 107 min / 2015 / Spanish with English subtitles

Shot in Colombia (because the director didn't get permission to film in Cuba) and featuring a cast consisting mostly of expatriate Cuban actors, Everybody Leaves is a celebration of freedom and a confrontation of the authoritarian Cuban regime of the 1980s, which led to one of the country's worst economic crises.

Past films from this 2016 series include:

La Sonrisa Verdadera (True Smile) - September 14 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 105, College Hall

Juan Rayos / Spain / 82 min / 2015 / Spanish with English subtitles
A heart-warming story of self-improvement, True Smile follows the extraordinary 1,300 kilometers journey Sergio, a blind autistic young man, undertakes with his brother. Over 30 days, Sergio and Juan Manuel traverse desert and high mountains by tandem    bike, starting in Cuenca in central Spain and finishing in one of the most remote villages in Morocco's Atlas Mountains.

 

 

Arrugas (Wrinkles) - September 28 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 105, College Hall

Ignacio Ferreras / Spain / 89 min / 2014 / Spanish with English subtitles
Based on Paco Roca's Award-winning graphic novel, Wrinkles illustrates the visual beauty and tender emotion that can be created by traditional animation, as it tackles a universal subject matter with humor and acerbic wit. Former bank manager Emilio is dispatched to a retirement home by his family. The hand-drawn animation style allows the film to move freely between the reality-bound daily lives of the ‘inmates' and their more colorful dementia-induced fantasies, leaving plenty of room for both tears and laughter and pulling no punches in its critique of society's attitude towards the elderly.

Spanish Instructor Carmen Martinez co-hosts a live radio show "Calle Pittsburgh!"

Calle Pittsburgh is a radio show that airs on Mondays, from 6:00 to 7:00 pm, live from WRCT 88.3 FM. The mission of Calle Pittsburgh is to bring visibility to the contributions of immigrants to the development of the region, with the underlying intention to educate the general public about who we are and what we do for the city.  The goal on the horizon is to open public communication and build bridges among the Anglo community and other communities in the area with the hope that intercultural relations become more fluid in all spheres of life.  

The show is intended for an English speaking audience. We cover topics such as technology, research, higher education, business and economic development, bilingual education, local development, arts and cultural projects, among other themes relevant to the mission of the show.  

Spring 2016 Events:

Call for papers for Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures is pleased to host the 29th annual Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference (PAFLC) on September 23-25, 2016. We cordially invite scholars to organize a session or submit a 200-word abstract before August 19, 2016. Presentation time is limited to 20 minutes. No papers will be read in absentia. All presenters must pay the $150.00 registration fee by August 30, 2016 to be included in the program. Proceedings will be published. More information will follow. Please see the attached flyer.

Performance for the "Reading to Play and Playing to Read"

On April 14, 2016, the project Reading to Play, Playing to Read culminated with six short performances with a strong message: health, nutrition and sickness prevention in Spanish. Beechwood Elementary and Duquesne students became actors and actresses to share the benefits of good nutrition and exercise. Students in Spanish Conversation and Composition II and Spanish for Healthcare Professionals, and children from the Casa San José after-school program did a phenomenal job performing the skits while encouraging everyone to adopt a healthier lifestyle!

 

"Reading to Play and Playing to Read"

"Reading to Play and Playing to Read," is a collaborative agreement with the after school program at Beechwood Elementary sponsored by the non-profit Casa San José. Students enrolled in MLSP 302W (Conversation and Composition II) and MLSP 280 (Spanish for Healthcare Professionals) will work with Beechwood students 2 days a week for 3 weeks, from March 30sth to April 14th. The project is meant to:

  1. Connect the language we are learning in the classroom about health for medical professionals with our own community,
  2. Bridge Spanish language and content focused on healthy lifestyles, health promotion and prevention through a community engaged experience
  3. Further Duquesne University's mission of service.

East Asian Expert Dr.Feigon's Residency at Duquesne  

We were excited about Dr.Lee Feigon's residency here at Duquesne during a week of March 14, 2016 sponsored by the Honors College. He has written for publications such as The Wall Street Journal, Barron's, Nation, the Chicago Tribune, The Atlantic, and the Boston Globe. He has been interviewed on television shows such as MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour, CNN, CNBC's Hardball, and the NBC Nightly News. He is the author of Mao: A Reinterpretation, the work on which the documentary is based, as well as of the acclaimed Demystifying Tibet: Unlocking the Secrets of the Land of the Snows, and China Rising: The Meaning of Tiananmen, a highly praised book that combines a historical perspective of the Tiananmen Movement with a first-hand view of the events leading up to this crisis. Japanese Culture Course taught by Keiko Rushlander enjoyed his lecture in the evening of March 14. He shared his firsthand knowledge of Tibet and personal anecdote with her students. Below is one of comments from her students:

Dr. Feigon's talk was an extremely interesting and an eye-opening experience. Dr. Feigon is an East Asian Expert that holds a great deal of positions, he is a writer, director, and a producer. His talk was centered on Tibet. He opened up his discussion with the how much different their culture was from what we are accustomed to. He briefly discussed the Tibetan warrior tribe, and how they would carry their swords around and if they went into a bar they would have to check their weapon in, so there wouldn't be any fights breaking out leading to deaths. Another aspect of his discussion about Tibet I found extremely interesting was that these people were able to construct some of the most astonishing architectural designed buildings in the world. I was stunned when Dr. Feigon pulled up a picture with his ‘His Holiness' or the Dalai Lama. It was interesting to hear that Dr. Feigon and the Dalai Lama had a meeting that lasted almost four hours, and they were openly discussing politics and the Chinese and Tibetan relations. His overall discussion was extremely informational, and I'm pleased that I got to hear a man of his stature present his findings of a countries various cultural identities that I will probably never get to visit ~ by Cody West, School of Business

   

Spanish students on the live radio show "Barrio Latino!"

Dr. Lucía Osa-Melero and students from her MLSP 302W-Community-Engagement Spanish Conversation & Composition II class participated in the Barrio Latino radio show on Thursday, March 10. Heidi Shellenbeger, Eli Badaczewski, Lex Monroe, and Vicente Zamarripa-Zoucha participated in the radio show. They talked about Dr. Osa-Melero's Mead Fellowship Award and the impact of "Niños y niñas bilingües y biculturales" on the students, the preschoolers and the community. Please click on a link below to the podcast to enjoy a live conversation in Spanish!
https://www.blubrry.com/barriolatinopgh/

                                

2016 Duquesne University Human Rights Film Series

The department is privileged to to serve as the organizer of the University's annual Human Rights Film Series, which is held in January and February. The series showcases award-winning documentaries and feature films dealing with the some of the most pressing human rights issues confronting the world today.

Click on the graphic above for the schedule of films and speakers for our 2016 series.

Click here for information about the more than 60 films we have shown in recent years.

Faculty Spotlight 2016:

 Dr. Lucía Osa-Melero was selected as a NECTFL (Northeast Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Mead Leadership Fellow. This program supports an individual in the development of a project that contributes to the foreign language teaching profession and advances quality language instruction. Dr. Osa-Melero's project focuses on the exploration of the value of learning a foreign language at a very early age in a global society.

Dr. Mark Frisch received an internal NEH Grant that supported the visit of the Cuban journalist, foreign correspondent, short story writer and poet, María Elena Llana, and her translator, Dr. Barbara Riess (Allegheny College), in October 2016.

Fall 2015 Events:

Living the Mission II

• Students in MLSP 301W-CE Spanish Conversation and Composition I completed their second community-engagement activity at Beechwood Elementary School.

• The after-school program, organized by the non-profit Casa San José, weekly assists Hispanic children, ages 5 to 8, in the process of improving their school performance.

• Duquesne students cooperated with Casa San José by teaching Christmas traditions, fully in Spanish, from some of the children's countries of origin: Honduras, Guatemala, México,Puerto Rico, and Spain.

• Both Duquesne students and Beechwood children fully enjoyed this process of teaching and learning, and they are already making plans for a bigger collaborative project for Spring 2016.

                 Beechwood 1     Beechwood 2

                   Beechwood 3

A Reading and Discussion with Cuban Author Maria Elena Llana  

Thursday, October 29, 2015
2:00 - 3:00 p.m. 644 College Hall

                 Maria Elena 2

Please see the attached flyer.

The Day of the Dead Celebration

The Day of the Dead is an ancient tradition celebrated in all of Latin America from October to November. Families remember their departed loved ones and celebrate their lives. Join us in celebrating this unique holiday. We will have craft-making workshops, discussions in Spanish and a communal altar installation.

Living the Mission I

Students in Spanish Conversation and Composition I completed their first community-engagement activity

• Dr. Lucía Osa-Melero guided her students, working cooperatively in pairs, to educate preschoolers on the value of a second language

• Duquesne students customized a lesson plan to teach colors, numbers, fruits and vegetables to the young preschoolers and created cultural lessons based on Hispanic popular culture

• Teachers, parents and preschoolers involved in the YMCA-Duquesne project highly valued the activity and have already requested more lessons

• In line with the Día de los Muertos event, students created lesson plans that compared the Halloween celebration in the USA to the Día de los Muertos festivities in Latin America and parts of the USA

• This project was supported by the YMCA Duquesne Early Development Center and the Community Engagement Teaching and Research Center (CETR)

                    

Annual Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures was pleased to host the 28th annual Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference (PAFLC) on September 25-27, 2015.

 

Spring 2015 Events:


Community Engaged Learning: "Reading to Play and Playing to Read"

In line with the mission of Duquesne University and the support and inspiration offered by the Community-Engaged Teaching and Research Center (CETR),, Dr. Vanessa Fernández and Dr. Lucia Osa-Melero initiated a community-engaged project entitled "Reading to Play and Playing to Read" during the Spring of 2015. This community-engaged project, forged through a partnership between the non-profit Pittsburgh organization Casa San José and the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at Duquesne University, combined the learning goals of two upper division courses: Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation and Spanish American Theatre of the Avant-Garde. Students from both courses worked cooperatively to develop a 3-week program on Mexican history and culture for Mexican children, ages 5 to 8, who had recently immigrated to the United States. College students wrote scripts, planned lessons, and taught children in an after school program once a week. The project culminated with creatively executed performances at Duquesne University. The Wimmer Family Foundation, the Department of Modern Languages&Literatures, Casa San José, and Beechwood Elementary in Beechview supported this collaborative effort from its inception. The project offered immeasurable benefits to both college students and our community partners. Photographs featured below better depict the profound impact that this experience had on children in Pittsburgh's Hispanic community and Duquesne's undergraduate students.

                                          

 

                                           

                                                                                                  

Salsa Night - February 6, 2015

   

   

Photo Gallery of Past Events

Cultural Performances

In the fall of 2012, the department hosted Los Valientes (The Courageous Ones), a live music theatre work for singing actor and onstage music trio of cello, piano and percussion. Based on the lives of three heroic Latinos, the show celebrates Mexican painter Diego Rivera, martyred Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero, and Mexican-American outlaw Joaquin Murrieta - some say the Zorro character was based on this historical figure. The music ranged from traditional Latino folk and popular songs sung in Spanish to instrumental works by Latin American composers.