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Student Spotlight
October/November 2015 Student Spotlight

Maggie Bahm


Major: Theology

Why Theology? It's open-minded and it makes you think philosophically.

Career Goals: I want to obtain a PhD in Theology with a concentration in Church History.

Best Place on campus: The Chapel or the new Black Box Theater.

Best Food on campus: Pizza at the Incline

Hidden Talents: Musical Theater. I am in the musical Company, which opens on October 29th in Duquense's Black Box Theater.

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Theology at Duquesne University

Why Major or Minor in Theology at Duquesne University?

Most students major or minor in theology because they find religious and theological questions fascinating and hope to discover more about how religion fits into their lives. Almost all seek to know more about the Christian tradition and its influence. Many plan to do graduate work in theology or religious studies in anticipation of teaching careers in high school, church-sponsored catechetical programs, or college. Theology also makes for a great second major and offers many educational benefits and career advantages, including:

• Provides a complement to other humanities and professional fields;
• Helps develop the ability to communicate and think critically about religious beliefs and values; and
• Contributes to a balanced intellectual background, including study of the importance of religion for individual and public life and the impact of theology on human society, past and present.
• Helps students develop religious literacy for navigating the contours of contemporary life.

So, whether you are looking to prepare for a graduate program in theological studies or a career in ministry, or just want to learn more about your faith tradition--stop by the 6th floor of Fisher Hall or email us to see if our program is the right fit for you!

The Theology Major
Theology Major 

Students majoring in theology are preparing to be moral, spiritual, and intellectual leaders in the community. Come and join the conversation! Our degree program requires students obtain a minimum of 30 credits in theology. Learn more about our degree program

Theology Major

The Theology Minor
Theology Minor 

Students minoring in theology are required to obtain a minimum of 15 theology credits. Three of those credits can be from a university core theology class. The remaining theology credits (4 classes) must be from 200-level or above courses.

For additional information or advising, please contact Elisabeth T. Vasko.

Theology Minor

Spring 2016 Course Offerings

Course Offerings in Theology

Theology faculty members teach a variety of courses that range from broad surveys to in-depth topical seminars.

•Complete List of 2016 Spring Course Offerings

Upper-Level Spring 2016 Course Offerings:

THEO 202/WSG 203 UCSL: Christianity and Violence
TR 1:40-2:55PM
Elisabeth T. Vasko, Ph.D.
Want to make a difference? Tired of just talking about social justice? Interested in psychology, sociology, public policy, education, or health, but still need to take a theology course? The course examines the research, writings, and experiences of women and men in the Christian tradition. Particular attention will be paid to religious justifications for violence and discrimination; and the role that theology and faith communities have played in both condoning and resisting such violence in the US. While various forms of violence will be discussed in this class; of particular focus will be the issue of sexual violence on college campuses in the United States.
*Additional Info: We will be working with PAAR and organizations on campus to research, design, and work toward implementing sexual violence advocacy and bystander intervention education. Time spent outside of class is flexible!
**Meets Social Justice Theme Area Requirement

THEO 204/AFST 204: Approaches to Black & African Theology
TR 1:40 - 2:55
Elochukwu Uzukwu, Ph.D.
This is an introductory course to theology from African and African American perspectives. Students are opened to not only the Roman Catholic theological traditions but also the diverse Christian approaches to theology within which Black, African, and Third World theologies are located. In engaging African and Black theological literature and methods, students are led to appreciate how African and Black history and tradition influence theology. The course assumes that theology is both an ecclesial and academic discipline; considers theological thinking as reasoned reflection and articulation of the ultimate meaning of human existence; identifies theological foundations with critical personal self-appropriation of one's own intellectual operations, moral and religious experience; and emphasizes participant (emic; insider) as well as the critical approach to the analysis and evaluation of African and Black theologies.

THEO 220: Jesus the Christ
R 6:00- 8:40 PM
Patrick Doering, Ph.D.
This course is an introduction to the Christian understanding of the identity and significance of the person of Jesus Christ. The class will include an examination of both the Old and the New Testament; the teachings of Jesus in the New Testament, especially the Parables; the Christological titles of the New Testament; the Creedal Christology of the Patristic period; some contemporary approaches; and literary presentations of the person of Christ. During our discussion of the Creedal Christology of the early Patristic Period we will closely examine the manner in which the early Church examined the Person of Christ transitionally from the biblical accounts to include a rational presentation using Greek philosophy and thought in her Conciliar pronouncements.

THEO 249: Ancient Egypt: Language Literature, Culture & Biblical Connections (x-listed with Classics)
TR 1:40-2:55
James Platt, Ph.D.
An investigation of the language, literature, culture and history of the ancient Egyptians. We will begin with the political unification of Egypt approximately 3100 BCE and continue through Pharaonic history until the periods of Greek and Roman occupation. This course will include a brief introduction to hieroglyphics and will explore the profound Egyptian influence on Biblical literature and history.

THEO 251-01: Sexuality, Sex & Morality (cross-listed with Women's and Gender Studies)
TR 10:50-12:05
Elizabeth Cochran, Ph.D.
Sex, sexuality, and social structures (such as the family) in which sexual interchanges play a constitutive role pose moral questions that are central to human identity and that are distinct from questions raised by other human experiences. This course explores the moral questions of sexual ethics in conversation with the intellectual resources of the Christian tradition, with special attention paid to Catholic theology. In considering these questions, one particular focus of the course is the notion of natural law, a philosophical and Christian conviction that the natural world reflects divine goodness and offers norms and guidelines for shaping human behavior. As part of its broader consideration of natural law, this course is particularly attentive to ways in which certain conceptions and constructions of gender are at work in moral norms regarding sexual behavior. Much of Christian teaching on sex presumes a fixed understanding of "male" and "female" as static and binary categories with biological roots. This presumption undergirds a number of moral arguments put forth by both Catholic and Protestant theologians in the United States. Attention to constructions of gender proves important for critical reflection on a number of contemporary moral issues such as sexual violence and sex trafficking, the "hookup culture," pornography, and prostitution.
*Meets Social Justice Theme Area Requirements

THEO 283: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
MWF 2:00-2:50
Kevin Storer, Ph.D.
This course will focus on the beliefs and practices of the three Western monotheistic religions as lived realities today. In each religious tradition, students will be equipped to interpret portions of each religion's sacred Scriptures in light of the contemporary context, using the traditional interpretive tools of that religious faith.
*Writing Intensive Course-pending approval

THEO 301-01 Marriage
TR 10:50-12:05
George Worgul, Ph.D.
We will look at interpersonal relationships and marriage from a sociological, cultural and theological perspective. Hooking up, cohabitation, divorced, sexual behavior, gay marriage etc. will be discussed.

PRFM 370-01/570-01 Cross Currents in Contemp Theo & Phil
TR 10:50-12:05
Kevin Mongrain, Ph.D. See professor for class description. 

Declaring Theology as Major/Minor

How do I declare a Theology major or minor?

All students must officially declare their major or minor in Theology by completing a Major and Minor declaration Form. Majors and minors may be declared at the same time on the same form. After completing the form, students should consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies to discuss their course schedules.

1. Log in to DORI.
2. In the upper right corner, click on INDEX.
4. Under BACHELOR'S PROGRAMS in the center of the page, click on RESOURCES FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS.
6. Just fill out the online form and you're done!

Research Opportunities

At Duquesne University there are a number of opportunities for undergraduate students to pursue research and scholarship. We strongly encourage theology majors and minors who desire pursuing graduate studies to participate in undergraduate research with the support of our internationally and nationally recognized faculty scholars.

Undergraduate Research Opportunities for Theology Majors and Minors