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Accomplishments

Recent Accomplishments by Our Students

Medical Humanities Conference

Congratulations to Evangel Sarwar for her recent acceptence into the Seventh Annual Western Michigan University Medical Humanities Conference. Evangel's presentation is enttled "Education and competency rich in genomics and ethics is a necessity for healthcare professionals in the era of genomics and personalized medicine."

The Jewish Healthcare Foundation Feinstein Fellowship for the Summer, 2017

Congratulations to Persis NaumannJasia Baig, and Hande Atalay for their recent acceptances into the JHF/HCF Fellowship.

European Society for Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care (ESPMH)

Congratulations to Ercan Avci for his recent acceptance into the 31st European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care. Ercan's presentation is entitled, "The Transformation of the 'Ars Moriendi' to 'Medicilazed Death'."

Duquesne University Graduate Student Research Symposium 2017

March 17th, 2017, Duquesne University







Evangel Sarwar
(Award for Graduate Research in Ethics)

Education and competency rich in genomics and ethics is a necessity for healthcare professionals in the era of genomics and personalized medicine









Hande Atalay (right)HIV-Related Stigma Among Healthcare Providers

Dina Siniora (left) Corporate Standards of Medicine and the Human Right to Healthcare











Persis Naumann
Globalization, Ethical Diversity, and the Importance of Integrating Global Bioethics in Healthcare Ethics Education






Natalie Dick
A Priority-Setting Framework for Health Care Organizations






Ethics of Integrating Research and Clinical Care Conference

Congratulations to Persis Naumann and Dina Siniora for their recent acceptance into the Ethics of Integrating Research and Clinical Care Conference at Cincinnati Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, OH. Their presentation is entitled: "Patients and Research Subjects' Rights and Access to Care in Developing Countries."

2017 HCE Conference Presentation Training Seminar

Congratulations to Yoelit Lipinsky for winning best graduate student presentation at the March 2017 HCE Conference Presentation Training Seminar. Yoelit's presentation is entitled: Fathering from Beyond the Grave? Peri-mortem Artificial Insemination, Secular Bioethics and Levirate Marriage.

Congratulations to all graduate student participants:

Michael O.S. Afolabi: "Individual 'Costs' of Public Health Directives: Ethical Analysis of the Recent Allegheny Water Incident."
Evangel Sarwar: "Education and competency rich in genomics and ethics as a necessity for healthcare professionals in the era of genomics and personalized medicine."
Dina Siniora: "Corporate Standards of Medicine and the Human Right to Healthcare."
Hande Atalay: "HIV-Related Stigma Among Healthcare Providers."
Nikolija Lukich: "Standards of Medicine and the Human Right to Healthcare."
Natalie Dick: "Rationing, Age and Bias in Bedside Decision-making: A Systematic Literature Review."

Fifth IAEE Conference on Ethics Education

Congratulations to Ercan Avci for his recent acceptance into the Fifth IAEE Conference on Ethics Education in Mangalore, Karnataka, India. Ercan's presentation is entitled: "Determining the Goals of Ethics Education in Healthcare." The conference takes place November 15th - November 17th, 2017.

Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine 

Congratulations to Kirarash Aramesh, M.D. for his recent publication in the Journal of Medical Ethics and History of Medicine. Kiarash's article is entitled: "History of attitudes toward death: a comparative study between Persian and Western cultures."

Archives of Iranian Medicine: Academy of Medical Sciences, I.R. Iran

Congratulations to Kiarash Aramesh, M.D. for his recent publication in the Archives of Iranian Medicine. Kiarash's article is entitled: "Fee Splitting among General Practitioners: A Cross-Sectional Study in Iran." 

2016 HCE Conference Presentation Training Seminar




Congratulations to Persis Naumann for her best presenter's award at the Conference Presentation Seminar, October 2016.

UNESCO Chair in Bioethics 12th World Conference in
Bioethics, Medical Ethics and Health Law

Congratulations to Hande Atalay for her recent acceptance into the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics 12th World Conference in Bioethics, Medical Ethics, and Health Law. Her presentation is entitled "Building Consensus in Decision-making around Ethical Dilemmas in HIV Prevention Trials: Challenges to determining the Standard of Care." Hande will present in March 2017. 

Tribune Review: Alzheimer's Milestone 

Congratulations to Carrie Stott for her recent Letter to the Editor Publication in The Tribune Review:

On Nov 3rd a major milestone was achieved in the fight against Alzheimer's disease when the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services confirmed that in 2017 it will begin covering the costs of cognitive and functional assessments and care planning for persons with cognitive impairments.

This will expand access to services which will improve quality of life and reduce health-care costs for people diagnosed with cognitive impairments. This was proposed through the HOPE for Alzheimer's Act. While portions of the HOPE Act continue to be advocated for, this is a step in the right direction, ensuring the many people affected by the disease have adequate support and services.

As a newly appointed Alzheimer's Association-Greater Pennsylvania Chapter advocate, I want to applaud the efforts of the Alzheimer's Association, Congressman Tim Murphy and all who worked diligently over the years to get the HOPE Act its well-deserved attention. Today, more than 5 million Americans live with Alzheimer's disease, the most costly disease in our country. November is National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month. Thanks to CMS for adding action to these awareness efforts!

European Society for Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care (ESPMH)

Congratulations to Ercan Avci for his recent acceptance into the 30th European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care. Ercan's presentation is entitled, "A Critical Approach to the Common Acceptance of Mill's Harm Principle in Mandatory Childhood Vaccination."

Fourth IAEE Conference on Ethics Education & Intercultural Encounter: Building Bridges & Bridging Gaps

Congratulations to Ercan Avci for his recent acceptance into the 4th IAEE conference. Ercan's paper is entitled, "Quality in Ethics Education: Learning from Experiences."

A Multidisciplinary Conference on Islamic Theology, Law, and Biomedicine: University of Chicago

Congratulations to Kiarash Aramesh, M.D. for his recent acceptance into the 2016 Multidisciplinary Conference on Islamic Theology, Law and Biomedicine at the University of Chicago. His presentation is entitled, "Shiite Perspective on the Relation between Islamic Jurisprudence and Bioethics."

Humanities in Health Conference (HinH-2016)

Congratulations to Kiarash Aramesh, M.D. for his recent acceptance into the 2016 HinH Conference at the University of Pittsburgh. His presentation is entitled, "Cultural Diversity and Research Ethics Guidelines: An Experience from Iran."

30th European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care

Congratulations to Evangel Sarwar and Ercan Avci for their recent acceptances into the 30th European Conference on Philosophy of Medicine and Health Care. 

Fourth International Conference on Ethics Education (IAEE)

Congratulations to Ercan Avci for his recent acceptance into the Fourth International IAEE conference. His paper is entitled, "Quality in Ethics Education: Learning from Experiences."  

Interfaces and Discourses: A Multidisciplinary Conference on Islamic Theology, Law, and Biomedicine

Congratulations to Kiarash Aramesh, M.D. for his recent acceptance into the Interfaces and Discources Conference. His paper is entitled, "Shiite Perspective on the Relation between Islamic Jurisprudence and Bioethics." 

American Educational Research Association (AERA)

Congratulations to Lyndsie Ferrara for her recent acceptance into the American Education Research Association Conference. Her paper is entitled, "Six Modes of Peircean Reasoning and Crime Scene Investigation Education."

JHF/HCF Fellowship on Death and Dying

Congratulations to Thomas Gerkin and Barbara Postol for their recent acceptances into the JHF/HCF Fellowship on Death and Dying.

The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly

Congratulations to Jordan Potter for his recent article acceptance in The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly. His article is entitlted, "The Principle of Double Effect in End-of-Life Care." 

Fifth International Conference on Infectious Disease Dynamics

Congratulations to Michael Afolabi for his recent abstract acceptance into the Fifth International Conference on Infectious Disease Dynamics for his paper, "Impending Epidemic of Extremily Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: A Socio-Ethical Examination of the African Context." (Winter 2015)

13th Annual Conference of the Neuroscience Society of Nigeria (NSN)

Congratulations to Michael Afolabi for his recent acceptance into the 13th Annual Conference of the Neuroscience Society of Nigeria (NSN) for his paper, "Vulnerabilities in Alzheimer's Disease: An Ethical Framework for the African Context."

Duquesne University Graduate Student Research Symposium 2015

Lyndsie Ferrara
"How Abductive Reasoning Impacts Criminal Investigations"



Daniel Hurst

"'Right to Try' Legislation: A complicated Ethical Matter"



Jordan Potter 
"An Ethical and Practical Analysis of the Benefits Associated with Compensated Live Organ Donation"


Jonas Salk Fellowship: 

Fall 2015

Ph.D. student, Daniel Hurst, has been awarded the Jonas Salk Fellowship. The 2015 Salk Fellowship will consider solutions to major population health problems through four problem-solving lenses:

Social advocacy: Ignite a social movement around a positive vision
Crisis management: Mobilize a coordinated response with urgency
Predictive modeling: Target interventions and simulate the outcomes
Disruptive innovation: Create technology solutions

Using each of these problem-solving lenses, the Fellowship will propose solutions to serious and persistent health problems. The Fellows will work in teams to define their group's problem with guidance from a topic expert in the first session. Each subsequent session will focus on one of the problem-solving lenses and include a presentation by a community expert about the lens and then a group activity to apply it to the teams' problems. At the December 3rd finale, the Fellows will present proposals for each of the problems to help inform our community's action plan.

Thomas Jefferson School of Nursing Journal club: Ethical Challenges and Moral Distress in the Acute Care Setting

May 19, 2015

Ph.D. student, DiAnn Ecret will be co-presenting work on moral distress and ethics for the Thomas Jefferson School of Nursing club which will contribute to continuing education for nurses, faculty, and students. The club seeks to bring attention to the contribution of moral distress and strategies to manage ethical challenges.

Jewish Healthcare Foundation Fellowship

Summer 2015

Ph.D. students, Natalie Dick and Carrie Stott, have been accepted into the Jewish Healthcare Foundation Patient Safety Fellowship class 2015. This fellowship provides to opportunity to collaborate with other disciplines to learn and apply quality improvement methodology for patient care. 

Northeast Ohio Medical University Bioethics and Humanities Conference
April 18, 2015

Daniel Hurst presented his paper Vulnerability and Exploitation: Understanding Central Concepts in Benefit Sharing.

Here is his accepted abstract:

The concepts of vulnerability and exploitation are central to the topic of benefit sharing. The philosophical principle of benefit sharing is, at its base, quite simple. Those populations that contribute to scientific research ought to share in any benefits derived from the research. At the core, this is a matter of justice, for if benefit sharing does not take place then exploitation may have occurred. Vulnerable populations, such as impoverished inhabitants of developing nations, may be particularly susceptible to such exploitation. One goal of international research ethics is to avoid the exploitation of research participants, for exploitation is not morally acceptable. This essay will discuss two key concepts for benefit sharing: vulnerability and exploitation. By examining benefit sharing and its relationship to vulnerability and exploitation, this essay concludes that international research studies should take into account their benefit sharing responsibilities in order to minimize the risk of exploitation on vulnerable populations. Lastly, recommendations towards best practice for benefit sharing will be offered.

 


 

Montreal Neuroethics Conference
April 17, 2015

Michael Afolabi presented his paper Mental Instablities a& Accountability: A Contextual Examination of an Alcohol withdrawal-induced Crime

Here is the accepted abstract:

Breaking a moral rule in an autonomous state implies deliberate and intentional reflection vis-à-vis the given act. This constitutes the moral fabric of imposing responsibility as well as legal liability and culpability. However, pathological and non-pathological conditions which create mental instabilities challenge the notion of autonomous capacity and, consequently, nuance the notion of accountability for violations of civil or legal statutes under such states. On this note, this paper explores the neuroethical implications of crimes committed in the context of mental instabilities. Employing a hypothetical case involving battery under the influence of alcohol-withdrawal symptoms, the paper offers a neuroethical polemic for legal exculpation as well as how this warrants some changes in relation to the concept of mens rea.


HCE hosted a Conference Presentation Training Seminar
Thursday, 12 March 2015

Michael Olusegun Afolabi
Psychoactive enhancements and creativity: A neuroethical justification

Kia Aramesh, M.D.
An Inquiry into the Meaning of Islamic Medicine and Islamic Bioethics

Carrie Stott
Why Care Ethics offers an Effective Framework for Managing the Burden of Alzheimer's Disease

Christine Skrzat
An Ethical Assessment of Three Approaches to the Genetic Technology Debate

Gary Edwards
On ‘Human Nature' in the Enhancement Debate: Toward a Question-Begging Justification for Changing the Subject

Daniel Hurst & Jordan Potter
Ongoing Research into Issues of Patient Autonomy and Informed Consent in the Asian-Indian Population

B. De Neice Welch
The Mississippi Appendectomy: The Ethical Implications of Forced Sterilization on African American Women in the United States


12 Globelics International Conference

October 28-31, 2014 Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

Michael Afolabi will be presenting "A Ubuntu-driven Innovation System for Public Health Ethics in Africa" at the Globelics International Coference. Here is his submitted abstract.

Graduate Student Research Symposium
November 7th, 2014, Duquesne University

Oral Presentations 

 





Shelley
Kobuck
"Global Health Disparities from a Catholic Social Teaching Perspective"









Christine Skrzat
"Revisiting Advance Directive Planning from a Holisitic Perspective"






Poster Presentations 




Reem Shinawi
"Justification of the Use of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Choosing Savior Children"






2nd Conference of the International Association for Education in Ethics, May 21-23 2014, Ankara, Turkey

Some of our students were accepted to present their papers at the international conference of IAEE in May. 

Aiyub Alwehaibi is presented: "A-daily-dose-of-ethics Teaching Method in Hospitals"

 

Rabee Toumi is presented: "Academic Healthcare Organizations: Moral Agency & Ingraining the Ethics of Patient Safety in Trainees"

  

10th International Conference for Clinical Ethics Consultation, April 24-26, 2014, Paris, France

Some of our students were accepted to present at the conference in April.

Michael AfolabiMichael O. Afolabi presented: "Patients as Bargaining Chips in Industrial Strikes: Some Ethical Reflections"

Here is the accepted abstract:
Industrial strike actions increasingly occur in the health sector across the world, though their frequency seems higher in developing countries. However, healthcare-related strike actions raise several ethical issues. Specifically, this is because they negate the telos of healthcare which involves fostering the medical good of society. On the other hand, entering into the caring professions goes with certain moral obligations in exchange for societal latitude for the power and privilege to practice. Against this conceptual background, this paper examines and explores the ethics of using patients as bargaining chips in healthcare disputes. Employing the notion of reciprocal beneficence, the paper argues that the impropriety of strikes is couched in a deontological understanding of the nexus around the duty to society, patients and professional interests. On this note, the paper advocates a patient-centered panacea vis-à-vis striking a moral balance between perceived conflicts of duty, contextual reality and the needs of the sick. Since healthcare constitutes an instinctual and institutional response to the ubiquitous phenomenon of illness, it is important that health professionals re-examine their moral commitments to society generally and to patients in particular in the light of strike actions.

Shelley Kobuck presented "Elder Abuse in the U.S.: When the Family Mutes the Voice of the Patient"

Here is the accepted abstract:
The topic of elder abuse in the United States is one that creates great emotion and is typically associated with long term health care institutions and services such as nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and professional home health care workers. What doesn't receive as much focus is the prevalence of elder abuse from the patient's very own family members. Because of the reticence for the elderly to report such abuses it is difficult to capture the true pervasiveness but in a study reported by the National Center for Elder Abuse (2011) it was estimated that between 7.6% and 10% of the elderly people studied were victims of some form of elder abuse primarily from someone within their own family. The notion that family members are predisposed to care and caring attributes simply due to the genetic or legal relationship designation is a flawed one. When elder abuse occurs from the family, the voice of the patient is muted. The patient's wishes are no longer given preference and the best interests of the patient are no longer honored. This presentation will look beyond patient rights and utilize an ethics of care approach to support patient autonomy in family elder abuse within the U. S. welfare and legal systems. Elder abuse will be defined by the varying types of actions or inactions that fall within the parameters for abuse along with the facts and figures to show the occurrences. Patient rights and the legal guidelines for decision-making on the part of the patient will be discussed as it relates to setting a foundation for potential exploitation. An ethics of care will be analyzed as a virtue in care and caring with a comparison to the rights and justice approaches that currently exist. Lastly, a summary of proposals for prevention, identification, and protections for the elderly will be covered.

Aiyub Alwehaibi presented: "Application of the Rule of Intention (Niyya) to Justify the Patients' Decisions for End-of-Life Care in Islamic Perspective"

Here is the accepted abstract:
In Islamic societies, Islamic law (Sharia'h), established upon the Holy Qur'an and Sunnah, is the legal foundation for all individual and communal matters in daily activities. Besides, bioethics and religion are not two separable elements in Islamic societies, which explains why reference to the Sharia'h plays such a significant role in Islamic bioethics. Any opinions regarding bioethics should remain anchored to the Sharia'h to be legitimate; otherwise, they risk losing credibility, or even losing the possibility of being presented in public. On the other hand, intention (Niyya) is a central concern in Sharia'h as being stated in the hadith "Actions are defined by intentions, and to every person what he intends." In general, Muslim jurists treat intent as definitive of human actions most of the time.
Not different from other societies, in Islamic societies, decision making in caring for terminally ill patients is a stressful duty for all involved parties. The attitudes, however, towards the issues vary among healthcare professionals, patients, patients' families, and religious authorities since each party also holds other obligations in addition to embracing the religion. Therefore, medical professionals must not only make medical decisions upon their professional ethics but also consider and respect for the patients' or their families' preferences and values. Additionally, acknowledging each involved party's intention would possibly justify or oppose to any course of actions in making decisions for end-of-life care. In Islamic perspective, euthanasia is disproved while palliative care is approved for its goals to improve the quality of patients' lives and to relieve the suffering.

Graduate Research Symposium

October 25th, 2013, Duquesne University

CONGRATULATIONS to our Alex Dubov for winning the Center for Catholic Intellectual Tradition & Spiritan Studies Award on his presentation "Religious Coping in the ICU". Here is a link to his winning presentation.

 Other students from the Center for Healthcare Ethics also presented during the Inaugural Graduate Student Research Symposium which took place on October 25th, 2013. Here is a link to the Symposium's website.

 Shelley Kobuck
"The Ethical Principle of Cooperation as a Determinant of Moral Agency in Nursing Home Leadership"

Aiyub Alwehaibi
"Application of the Rule of Intention (Niyya) to justify End-of-Life Decision Making in Islamic Perspective"

Barbara Postol
"An ethical analysis of the concept of disease mongering and its effect on healthcare, research, and patient safety"