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Graduate Curriculum

500. Professional Communication. 3 cr. 
Cultivates knowledge and skill in theories and practices of professional communication--oral and written--for graduate students in Communication & Rhetorical Studies. Builds advance marketplace skills through oral and written performance. 

501. Persuasion in the Marketplace. 3 cr. 
Examines the construction and interpretation of persuasive messages in the marketplace. Emphasis on examining recent historical changes and theoretical shifts in message form and strategies.

503. Presentational Communication Skills. 3 cr.
Prepares students to grasp the dynamics and constraints of addressing people with oral communication in professional performance contexts. From a base in rhetorical theory and philosophy of communication, the course equips students to handle a range of oral presentations with agility, including principles and practices of audio-visual support.

505. Professional Communication Pedagogy. 3 cr.
Offers M.A. students an opportunity to work with a professor in instructing undergraduate students in professional communication. Useful for students interested in training and development in the corporate environment.

506. Political Communication. 3 cr.
Examines the gamut of public political debate in the light of historical origins and development in the context of rhetorical and political theory.

507. Intercultural Communication. 3 cr. 
Exposes the student to the importance of communication among and between politically, culturally, and ethnically diverse people as a bridge to understanding in an increasingly multi-cultural world.  This course explores the role of interpersonal perception in communicating with persons from varied cultures, and allows the student to apply these understandings in their own lives.

514. Rhetoric, Religion & Society. 3 cr. 
Seeks to understand religion, not as a psychological experience, nor even as a set of doctrine or beliefs, but as a rhetorical symbolizing of experience.  The aim of this course is to introduce how the rhetoric of religious symbols influence and enrich our daily living.  The centrality of rhetorical symbolism to religion is evident whenever we think about the activities most often associated with religious practice.

515. Organizational Communication. 3 cr. 
Examines current research in organizational communication.  Topics including organizational socialization, decision-making, leadership, functionalist, interpretive, and cultural perspectives, systems and information processing approaches, communication networks, structure and environment, and other classic and contemporary issues.

517. Multinational Communication. 3 cr.
Focuses on the similarities and differences in the way people from different nations think, act, and communicate.

518. Conflict Management in Organizations. 3 cr. 
Examines the role of communication in managing and regulating interpersonal and organizational conflict. Application to conflict in everyday interpersonal and professional communicative interaction is explored.

520. Family Communication. 3 cr.
Examines the role of communication in the construction and maintenance of family (i.e., primary human relationships and groups).  Students will encounter ways of viewing family interactions from both the traditional and new approaches to the family unit, describe the major theoretical perspectives underlying family communication, and explore cultural differences in family formation, communication, and expectations. The course will identify how families communicate rules, roles, and stories that are essential to the process of meaning-making in the family and its development.
 

521. Communication and Gender. 3 cr.
Examines research addressing differences and similarities in male and female communication styles in a variety of contexts, ranging from personal to social to work relationships, with attention given to philosophical and narrative understandings of what it means to be male and female persons.

522. Communication Research Methods. 3 cr.
Prepares students to interpret and design qualitative and quantitative research in the field of communication. Attention is given to experimental design, surveys/questionnaires, and qualitative methods of research within the context of asking and answering questions about communication processes and preparing research reports. Course may include design of a study and interpretation of results.

523. Communication Ethics & Professional Civility. 3 cr. 
Providers an applied understanding of Communication Ethics. The course brings ethical discussion to the workplace and to professional life, while providing a philosophical foundation for understanding the history and significance of the civility for public life.

524. Civic Communication in a Democratic Society. 3 cr.
Examines the role of communication in the civil functioning of a democratic society. Readings span the scope of Alexis de Tocqueville to Mary Ann Glendon.

526. Free Speech & Responsibility. 3 cr.
Explores the rhetorical interplay between free speech and communicative responsibility.  Historical cases and contemporary issues in free speech are examined from a standpoint of communicative responsibility.

527. Communication Management. 3 cr. 
Introduces the communication professional to the principles of managerial communication.  Theory and application of managerial best practices are discussed.  Students focus on scholarship of managerial communication and discuss differing managerial styles in relation to different corporate structures.

529. Integrated Marketing Comm Strategies I: PR. 3 cr.
Instructs students in the principles of integrated marketing communication for public relations contexts.  Interpersonal, organizational and managerial strategies are integrated through theories of persuasion.  Students learn rhetorical versatility and responsiveness in managing dialogue with diverse publics.  This versatility is based on principles of persuasion, intercultural communication and crisis communication management for organizations. This course prepares students for advanced internships and employment in integrated marketing communication contexts. 

533. Integrated Marketing Comm Strategies II: AD. 3 cr. 
Instructs students in the principles of integrated marketing communication for advertising contexts.  Advertising is explored as a persuasive, rhetorical activity.  Students learn rhetorical versatility and responsiveness in constructing messages for diverse audiences through principles of intercultural communication in the global marketplace.  Prepares students for advanced internships and employment in integrated marketing communication contexts.

536. Integrated Marketing Comm: Coordinating AD/PR. 3 cr. 
Covers the principles and practices of marketing communication.  Emphasizes a comprehensive, integrated approach to the total coordinated integrated marketing communication mix including advertising, public relations, sales, promotion, personal selling, and interactive strategies.

538. Integrated Marketing Comm: Interactive Strategies. 3 cr.
Examines theoretical and practical communicative strategies behind interactive marketing.  This course will challenge students to apply communication theory in order to support and articulate the role of online strategies in integrated campaign planning.  In addition, students will gain a comprehensive understanding of how to think about and implement strategic interactive tactics through hands-on projects.

539. Integrated Marketing Comm RFPS: AD/PR. 3 cr.
Examines a crucial stage of the persuasive communication in IMC: responding to RFPs, or “Requests for Proposals.”  Teaches students to apply strategies of analysis, persuasion, and public speaking/presentations in diverse interpersonal and public contexts.  Students plan integrated advertising and/or public relations campaigns, learning the importance of audience analysis, principles of intercultural communication, and interpretation of institutional/organizational discourse as the learn to “pitch” proposals to potential clients.

540. Communication Ethics & Technology. 3 cr.
Examines the implications of technology for communication ethics.  Technology’s impact on interpersonal, organizational, and public communication is addressed.


541. Corporate Communication: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Communication. 3 cr.

Explores the role of strategic corporate communication in positioning an organization’s mission and      identity with regard to environmental concerns for internal and external publics/stakeholders.

542. Environmental Communication. 3 cr.

Explores the communicative practices of activists, advocates, consumers, corporations, governmental organizations, and the public about the impact of human behavior on the Earth. Concern with changes in the environment caused by human behavior has permeated all layers of human society.  Grounded in a strategic communication/ rhetorical approach to environmentalism, the course engages praxis—theory-informed action—to examine construction of strategic persuasive messages about the environment designed to bring about behavioral change.


543. Communication Theory. 3 cr.

Introduces various theories of communication in and across contexts, including theories of language, meaning, and human interaction and relationships, highlighting major theoretical perspectives that inform communication scholarship . Emphasis is placed on understanding human communication as a symbolic process that creates, maintains, and alters personal, social, and cultural identities.


545. Non-Profit Development & Philanthropy Comm. 3 cr.

Identifies the components of a strategic plan, comprehensive development initiatives, incoming-producing initiatives, and non-profit organizational structure, history, and ethics from the perspective of theory-informed action, or praxis. Students will develop grant-writing skills and learn to analyze the stakeholder context of non-profit organizations from a corporate communication perspective.

554. Interpersonal Communication. 3 cr. 
Examines communication between persons in the context of a variety of public and private human relationships from philosophical and theoretical standpoints. 

555. Small Group & Team Communication. 3 cr.
Examines decision-making processes in small groups. Students will be introduced to major theories in the field, including Hirokawa and Scheerhorn's model of decision making. Topics covered include leadership, errors in decision making, and effective communication in small groups.

557. Communication, Science & Revolution. 3 cr.
Examines the relationship between the rhetoric of science and the rhetoric of revolution in the context of the modern worldview arising out of the Enlightenment.

558. Rhetoric of Popular Culture. 3 cr.
Examines documents of popular culture that reinforce through rhetorical means modern and postmodern worldviews as experienced in popular consciousness. Covers the rhetorical-communication theories of the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Ramus, Burke, Perlman, Ong and Hudson.

559. Philosophy of Communication. 3 cr.
Explores the assumptions and presuppositions about communication found in philosophical studies of communication.  Addresses topics such as meaning, interpretation, representation, and speech acts.

560. Seminar: Communication & Religion. 3 cr.
Consists of revolving topics and authors interested in the interplay of communication and religion within culture, society and community.  This seminar examines topics and authors supportive of the Catholic mission of the Spiritan Fathers.

561. Rhetorical Theory. 3 cr. 
Provides a theoretical introduction to classical through contemporary rhetorical theory and action. Examines primary and secondary texts.

567. Rhetoric of Religion & Nonviolence. 3 cr.
This course examines the connection between religious narrative and nonviolence. Key metaphors of respect, responsibility, discipline and faith guide examination of authors such as Martin Luther King Jr., Thomas Merton, Dorothy Day and Mahatma Gandhi. This course applies religious nonviolence to multiple rhetorical settings through final paper projects completed by M.A. and Ph.D. students.

570. Graduate Research and Development. 3 cr.

Provides opportunity for graduate students to serve as project managers for students enrolled in Undergraduate R & D I. Students guide undergraduate students in conducting research on topics in the field of applied communication, evaluating evidence, constructing white papers, and delivering information to clients. The course centers upon delivery of integrated marketing communication (public relations, advertising, and marketing) and corporate communication research in cooperation with clients in the for-profit and not-for-profit marketplace.


571. Graduate Research and Development II. 3 cr.

Provides opportunity for graduate students to serve as project managers for students enrolled in Undergraduate R & D I. Students guide undergraduate students in conducting research on topics in the field of applied communication, evaluating evidence, constructing white papers, and delivering information to clients. The course centers upon delivery of integrated marketing communication (public relations, advertising, and marketing) and corporate communication research in cooperation with clients in the for-profit and not-for-profit marketplace.


578. History of Communication. 3 cr.

Analyzes major social influences affecting communication theory and practices from classical to contemporary times. Theorists emphasized include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero , Augustine, John of Salisbury, Bacon, Campbell, Whately, Kames, Watzlawick, and Berger.

584. Health Communication. 3 cr.
Examines communication theory and research in a variety of health care contexts, including interpersonal, small group, team, organizational, and public communication.

585. Health Care Communication Ethics. 3 cr.
Examines how the structure of health care organizations affects the communication within them. The class will use case studies to analyze how well health-care professionals communicate with one another and how their attitudes about professionals affect their ability to communicate. The course will also examine the ethical mission of health care organizations and professions and how the communication process helps or hinders that mission.

586. Organizational Consulting. 3 cr.
Provides an introduction to organizational intervention through communication-based training and development programs.  Specific topics covered may include organizational audit techniques and adult learning theory, as well as designing, conducting, and evaluating several different types of training efforts.

587. Event Planning: Communication Architecture. 3 cr.
Focuses on designing integrated communication approaches for implementation in specific contexts such as conferences, professional meetings, celebratory events, and programs for community outreach.  Working from a theory-informed action (praxis) approach, students engage the professional, interpersonal, and organizational coordination of information, people and budget(s). 

590. Special Topics – Communication. 3 cr.
Check semester class offerings for special classes offered.

592. Communication Ethics: Pedagogy. 3 cr.
Instructs in the philosophy and pedagogy of communication ethics through apprenticeship with the faculty instructor. A course project tired to communication praxis in pedagogy will emerge from the student's participation in the core course, including regular meetings with the faculty member teaching the course, instructional support, evaluation of undergraduate work, and course logistics. Approval of the instructor and department chair required for registration.

593. History of Communication: Pedagogy. 3 cr.
Instructs in the philosophy and pedagogy of the history of communication through apprenticeship with the faculty instructor. A course project tired to communication praxis in pedagogy will emerge from the student's participation in the core course, including regular meetings with the faculty member teaching the course, instructional support, evaluation of undergraduate work, and course logistics. Approval of the instructor and department chair required for registration.

594. Integrated Marketing Communication Pedagogy. 3 cr.
Instructs in the philosophy and pedagogy of planning an integrated marketing communication campaign. A course project related to developing a strategic communication plan that emphasizes the importance of communication ethics will emerge from the student's participation in the classroom. Regular meetings with the faculty member teaching the course are required as well as outside research and instructional support and evaluation of undergraduate work.

601. Communication Practicum. 3 cr. 
Allows individuals who lack relevant prior experience in their chosen career area to demonstrate application of what has been learned in the program. Depending on the circumstances, the practicum can be fulfilled through either a supervised experience at an appropriate agency, company or institution or a detailed project undertaken by a student under the supervision of a faculty member to demonstrate the application of what has been learned in the program.

604. Seminar: Communication Ethics. 3 cr.
Examines discourse ethics from traditional and contemporary philosophical perspectives.

607. Rhetoric & Philosophy of Intercultural Communication. 3 cr.

Surveys the process of communication between and among persons who are different from one another in one or more cultural ways. Topics may include, but are not limited to, communication in and across cultures outside the United States , communication among cultural groups within the United States, an investigation of the role of diversity and culture in the public arena, and the nature of ethics in the intercultural communication.

 

609. Rhetorical Theory. 3 cr.
Examines the history and theory of rhetoric ordinarily with emphasis on one historical period.

611. Rhetoric & Hermeneutics. 3 cr.
Explores the subject of intimacy between rhetoric and hermeneutics. By emphasizing the genealogical history of rhetoric, students will see that both disciplines reveal a pragmatic, poetic, and deconstructive constellation, revealing an intriguing, dynamically open understanding of communication.

614. Rhetoric & Philosophy of Crisis Management. 3 cr.
Examines crisis management from a rhetorical and philosophical perspective. Lectures outline major crisis in various historical periods, discussing the rhetorical interruptions that announced “a crisis,” the manner in which the crisis was understood philosophically, and the practical communicative responses to a given crisis. Students read and present material from scholarly journals on crisis management and write a research paper on an organization that successfully managed a crisis framing the rhetorical interruption, the philosophy that centered the crisis and response, the practical rhetorical responses used in meeting the crisis, and an evaluation of the rhetorical consequences of the crisis management. Rhetoric and Philosophy of Crisis Management provides a humanities background for understanding the interaction of rhetoric, philosophy, and crisis management and the practical application of this understanding to contemporary acts of organizational crisis management.

615. Rhetoric & Philosophy of Organizational Communication. 3 cr.
Examines organizational communication from a variety of theoretical, philosophical, and methodological perspectives.

622. Rhetoric & Philosophy of Communication Scholarship. 3 cr.
Introduction to graduate study which examines the ideas and literature of communication and rhetorical studies. Addresses valued ways of knowing as well as practical skills needed for professional success.

626. Rhetoric & Philosophy of Ethics of Free Speech. 3 cr.
Explores the philosophical grounding of free speech as a rhetorical practice within the Western tradition. Historical and contemporary perspectives for discourses in a democratic society are considered.

632. Hermeneutic Phenomenology. 3 cr.
Engages primary and secondary scholarship of authors in the phenomenological philosophical tradition. Students meet together with seminar leaders weekly after reading assigned textual material. The seminar is designed as a six-semester experience. Students provide a 1-page per chapter summary/reaction for materials read. At the conclusion of the class, students will use one philosopher as a lens for their interpretive work, submitting an essay for review at a regional or national conference. An interpretive or summary essay concludes the six-semester experience; students turn in a folder each year to the co-directors of the seminar, providing evidence of a scholarly essay addressing a communicatively rich content area topic explored from a phenomenological and/or existential phenomenological interpretive perspective.

633. Rhetoric & Philosophy of Advertising. 3 cr. 
Studies advertising communication from rhetorical and phenomenological perspectives. Historical, critical, and professional literatures inform ethical praxis approaches to advertising in the context of integrated marketing communication.

634. Rhetoric & Philosophy of Communication Economics. 3 cr.
Examines the rhetorical and philosophical implications of historical development in Communication Economics, detailing the relationship between economics and the type of information provided, the manner of investigation, and the style of presentation.

635. Rhetoric of the Marketplace. 3 cr.
Examines the rhetorical implications of the construction, evolution, and social importance of the marketplace. The course traces changes in the marketplace through historical periods.

636. Rhetoric & Philosophy of Integrated Marketing Communication. 3 cr. 
Examines social and cultural implications of historical and current marketing communication practices from a humanities perspective.

649. Rhetoric & Philosophy of Public Relations. 3 cr. 
Studies Public Relations practices, historical and current, from a humanities perspective. The social obligations of relating to publics from a corporate setting is examined from a humanities perspective.

654. Philosophy of Interpersonal Communication. 3 cr.
Humanities study of Interpersonal Communication theory and action. Course explores the philosophical implications of current and past theories in interpersonal communication.

659. Philosophy of  Communication. 3 cr.

Examines basic philosophical assumptions that undergrad traditional and contemporary communication theory. The graduate student will analyze the work of a scholar doing philosophical study of communication such as Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Hans Gadamer, or Jurgen Habermas.

678. Rhetoric of the Humanities. 3 cr.
Considers the rhetorical implications of art, philosophy, architecture, politics, religion, etc., of major historical eras, thereby increasing their knowledge of the intellectual and cultural dynamics involved in interpretation, theory and practice from a rhetorical perspective.


690. Directed Reading in Communication. 1-6 cr.
Allows in-depth study of an area not available in the current curriculum or otherwise accessible because of scheduling conflicts. In order to qualify for a Directed Reading, the student must submit an application letter to a faculty member into the chosen area of study. The application is due at least three weeks before the beginning of the semester and must include a critical bibliography of books and periodicals to be read, with a summary of the contents of each. The minimum reading requirement consists of at least six books or a comparable collection of articles from periodicals. During the course, students are required to write 3-5 page papers on each reading selection, and a final paper of at least ten pages synthesizing the reading undertaken. Not available to students doing a thesis. Approval of a member of the graduate faculty and of the department chair is required.

700. Thesis – Communication. 1-6 cr.
Students undertake a significant research project resulting in a thesis. The study is directed by a member of the graduate faculty and a 3+ person committee. Available only to those anticipating continuing their studies in a Ph.D. program. Prerequisite: Approval of a member of the graduate faculty and of the department chair.

701. Dissertation Communication (FT). 1-6 cr.

702. Teaching Practicum. 0-3 cr.
Affords an opportunity, though infrequently, for experienced students, to earn academic credit by assisting faculty in a classroom setting.


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