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Classics Courses in English

(No Greek or Latin Required)

Classical History and Archaeology courses:

CLSX 111. Art History: Ancient-Medieval. 3 cr.

A chronologically oriented, detailed presentation of the history of Western art. This survey deals with Near Eastern, Greek, Roman, Early Christian and Medieval Art.

CLSX 210. Caput Mundi:  Rome Center Divine World. 3cr.

An overview of the cultural history of Rome from c. 400 BC to AD 590. This course uses the city of Rome with its abundance of archaeological sites and museums to provide a comprehensive overview of the Roman world, its history, culture and society.

CLSX 240. Introduction to Archaeology. 3 cr.

An overview of the discipline of archaeology. We will consider the discipline's aims, history, theories, and methods, and will devote special attention to its modern practice, problems, ethical concerns, and significance. The course will address, in turn, the nature of archaeological evidence, how we interpret it, and what we should do with it.  While we often will focus on archaeological sites in the Mediterranean and Near East, discussion will touch on others throughout the world. As will be clear immediately and throughout, at the heart of this course is the identity of human beings, past and present.  

CLSX 242. Ancient Law. 3cr.

A survey of the contributions of the Greeks and of the Romans to the development of law.

CLSX 300. Seminar. 3 cr.

Topics variable.

CLSX 315. Archaeological History: Ancient Greek World. 3 cr.

A survey of the archaeology of Greece from prehistory to the Roman period.

CLSX 316. Archaeological History of Athens. 3 cr.

An investigation into the topography and monuments of Athens and Attica, from the prehistoric to the Roman period.

CLSX 317. Archaeological History: Ancient Roman World. 3 cr.

An investigation into the archaeology and artifacts, art, and architecture of the Roman world, from the Iron Age (c.1000 BCE) through the reign of the emperor Constantine (in the 4th century CE). We will examine material evidence including private and public buildings, tombstones and other monuments, sculpture, painting, mosaics, pottery, tools, and inscriptions. Throughout, we will focus on the potential of material evidence to tell us about Roman life and society across time. In particular, we will explore the powerful role of art in the articulation and construction of identity and the close ties between material culture and politics.

CLSX 318. Archaeological History of Rome. 3 cr.

An investigation of the topography and monuments of Rome from prehistory through Constantine.

CLSX 319. Archaeological History: Seminar. 3 cr.

Possible topics include the Bronze Age Aegean, the development of Vase Paintings, the Etruscans, the Ara Pacis, etc.

CLSX 320 Ancient Shrines. 3 cr.

An exploration of some of the sacred spaces of the ancient world, with particular emphasis on Greek and Roman examples. Special attention will be paid to how the Greeks and Romans viewed and encountered physical monuments, temples and shrines.

CLSX 321. Art, Architecture, and Archaeology of the Augustan Period. 3 cr.

An examination of the Augustan period in the light of its material culture focusing on the art and architecture produced under Augustus in Rome and his influence upon the later Roman Empire and the Fascist archaeology under Mussolini.

CLSX 400. Independent Reading & Research. 3 cr.

This course provides an opportunity to do independent reading and research under the supervision of a faculty member with approval of the Chairman.

CLSX 500. Independent Study 3 cr.

This course provides an opportunity to do independent reading and research under the supervision of a faculty member with approval of the Chairman.

Classical Literature in Translation courses:

CLSX 122. Etymology of Scientific Terms. 3 cr.

Introduction to Greek and Latin elements of scientific terminology.

CLSX 223C - Classical Mythology. 3 cr.

A study of the major myths of Greece and Rome with special attention to their influence on art and literature. (Theme Area: Creative Arts)

CLSX 230. Ancient Theatre. 3 cr.

An examination of the origins and development of ancient tragedy and comedy. Special attention is given to the representation of myth, sex, death, and humor.

CLSX 231. Ancient Epic. 3 cr.

A study of ancient epic literature with particular attention to the techniques of oral and literary composition.

CLSX 233. Ancient Satire. 3 cr.

An investigation of the satirical element with reference to the writings of Lucilius, Horace, Persius, Martial, and Juvenal.

CLSX 234. Demons, Angels, Sinners, and Saints. 3 cr.

An examination of the representations of sanctity and sin in a variety of medieval texts. This course focuses specifically on how models of corporeality, sex, and gender shape notions of holiness and hellishness.

CLSX 235. Love and Violence in Roman Poetry. 3 cr.

An exploration of the poetic representations of love and violence in Propertius, Catullus, Vergil, Juvenal, and Ovid, with special attention to Roman representations of sex and gender.

CLSX 236. Greek, Roman and Medieval Mothers. 3 cr.

An exploration of the representation of mothers, motherhood, and the maternal body in medical, mythological, and religious literature from ancient Greece to the High Middle Ages.

CLSX 300. Seminar. 3 cr.

Topics variable.

CLSX 303W. Seminar: Women in Antiquity. 3 cr.

An exploration of the reality of women's lives in ancient Greece and Rome. Sex and gender dynamics, and the representation of women in materials artifacts, are discussed.

CLSX 322. Rome's Golden Age-Augustan Literature. 3 cr.

An English Reading of the works of Vergil, Horace, Propertius, and Ovid as well as Livy's histories.  The readings are all from literature that would have glorified Rome, its beginnings, and the first emporer's own lineage; special attention will be paid to Vergil's Aeneid.

CLSX 400. Independent Reading & Research. 3 cr.

This course provides an opportunity to do independent reading and research under the supervision of a faculty member with approval of the Chairman.

CLSX 500. Independent Study 3 cr.

This course provides an opportunity to do independent reading and research under the supervision of a faculty member with approval of the Chairman.