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Center for Metals in Biological Systems (cMBS)

Faculty Members

Dr. Partha Basu

Dr. Partha Basu
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Basu is interested in understanding the structure function relation in mononuclear molybdenum enzymes such as the nitrate reductase and arsenate reductase. His current research is targeted to understand the oxygen atom transfer reactivity in various molybdenum containing enzymes.

Dr. Ellen Gawalt

Dr. Ellen Gawalt
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Gawalt's group focuses on interfacial reactions on metal and ceramic biomaterials. Our current project involves enhancing implant biocompatibility by resisting protein and cellular adhesion on metal surfaces.

Dr. Skip Kingston

Dr. H.M. "Skip" Kingston
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Kingston's current research interests include speciation of mercury species in biological samples using novel methodologies.


Dr. Tomislav Pintauer

Dr. Tomislav Pintauer
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Pintauer's research interests are in the areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry with special emphasis on homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis by transition metal complexes. Also of interests are the exploration of amino acid functionalized transition metal complexes in supramolecular chemistry, electron transfer, molecular recognition and drug delivery.

Dr. Kyle Selcer

Dr. Kyle W. Selcer
Department of Biological Sciences

Dr. Selcer's current research is to investigate environmental toxicants that disrupt the endocrine system, the role of steroids in reproduction of reptiles and amphibians and new drugs for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. In many cases, Zn seems to play a role which is yet to be clearly understood.

Dr. David W. Seybert

Dr. David W. Seybert
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Seybert is interested in metal-catalyzed lipid peroxidation (LP) and the functional effects of LP byproducts on cellular macromolecules Other interests include membrane control of regioselectivity of cytochrome P450.


Dr. John Stolz

Dr. John F. Stolz
Department of Biological Sciences

Dr. Stolz is interested in understanding microbial role in transforming inorganic compounds. His current research project focuses in the microbial transformation of arsenic, selenium and nitrate.