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Atomic Physics

 

 

 

 

 

 

Atomic physics studies the fundamental quantum mechanical interactions in matter. The research at Duquesne uses dilute gases of atoms as quantum building blocks to study the many states of matter. When atoms are cooled to temperatures near absolute zero, their quantum nature manifests itself. Under these conditions the atoms can be arranged into patterns using light and made to interact in varying ways by subjecting them to magnetic fields and lasers. Currently, we are interested in building analogs to exotic two-dimensional materials such as topological insulators.

Our atomic physics research program also has strong collaborations with the Duquesne University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Optical systems built by physics students are used for various types of chemical analysis including fluorometry and photodissociation.

Much of the equipment in our atomic physics research lab is built largely by our students: vacuum systems, electronic devices, and laser systems.

Members

Members

Theodore Corcovilos, PhD, Assistant Professor
Robert Brooke, undergraduate physics major, Duquesne University
Isaac Davies, undergraduate physics major, Duquesne University
Drew Finton, undergraduate physics major, Duquesne University
Julie Gillis, undergraduate physics major, Duquesne University
Ed Heinle, undergraduate physics major, Duquesne University
Tim Ireland, undergraduate physics major, Duquesne University
Gage Tiber, undergraduate physics major, Duquesne University


Past Members

Anthony Ruggiero, undergraduate physics major, Duquesne University
Chris Zaccagnini, undergraduate physics major, Duquesne University

Collaborations

Dr. Corcovilos is a member of the Executive Board of the Pittsburgh Quantum Institute


Infrared multiphoton dissociation in gas-phase ions. Michael J. van Stipdonk, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University

Fluorometric detection of heavy-metal ions in solution. Partha Basu, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University

Theoretical studies of two-dimensional heterostructures. Vincent Liu, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Physics, University of Pittsburgh

Synthetic gauge fields and topological materials. David Pekker, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Department of Physics, University of Pittsburgh

Quantum Computing in a 3D array of neutral atoms. David Weiss, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University

Instrumentation

Room 227 Fisher Hall

Michelson Interferometer
Home-built optical wavelength meter featuring a Michelson Interferometer and a polarization-stabilized Helium-Neon reference laser

Potassium vapor saturated absorption spectroscopy
Potassium vapor saturated absorption spectroscopy setup featuring a MogLabs ECD-004 tunable diode laser and home-built Arduino temperature controller


Newport vibration-isolated optics table with the optical wavelength meter in the foreground and Varian turbomolecular pumping station in the background