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    $431,000 Grant Funds Atomic-Level Exploration of Semiconductors at Duquesne

    Dr. Jennifer Aitken, associate professor of chemistry at Duquesne University, knows semiconductors at their atomic level. Her studies of semiconductor compounds used in everything from solar cells to imaging equipment examine exactly how atoms are arranged.

    This research has attracted a $431,000, three-year grant from the National Science Foundation.

    "I can use X-ray diffraction to see where the atoms actually are located in a structure," Aitken said. "You're looking at something nobody has looked at before!"

    Semiconductors, which essentially replaced the once-ubiquitous vacuum tube in products and processes, can be formed from many different combinations, which create new materials.

    Once Aitken has established a new compound, creativity meets science. "You can be working with known materials and can substitute other substances to maximize the properties you want," said Aitken, who has been surprised by some of her discoveries.

    "I initially thought what I was introducing would have interesting magnetic properties-but it didn't," said Aitken, who works with compounds of copper indium selenide. "It turned out to be even more interesting. I improved the thermoelectric properties and performance by just putting a little manganese into the structure."

    Aitken's research doesn't stop with chemical wizardry. "I have to ask, 'Why did this happen? Why didn't I get the magnetic properties I was hoping for? Where is the magnesium even appearing in the crystal lattice? If we can understand this, it's a concept that can be used with other related materials to improve their properties, too."

    The scientific discovery possible through this project-Optical, Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Multi-Cation Diamond-Like Semiconductors: Intricate Semiconductor Systems for Physical Property Tuning-is only one of Aitken's goals. Aitken, who initiated Duquesne's award-winning Project SEED program, has made a point to provide graduate and undergraduate students, even high schoolers, opportunities to contribute.

    "It's important that we're educating the next generation of scientists," Aitken said.

    "In addition to her cutting-edge research in developing novel semiconductors, Dr. Aitken's extraordinary ability to mentor undergraduate and graduate students in their research has had a profound effect upon the quality of our chemistry program in the Bayer School," said Dean David Seybert.

    Duquesne University

    Founded in 1878, Duquesne is consistently ranked among the nation's top Catholic research universities for its award-winning faculty and tradition of academic excellence. The University is nationally ranked by U.S. News and World Report and the Princeton Review for its rich academic programs in 10 schools of study for 10,000-plus graduate and undergraduate students, and by the Washington Monthly for service and contributing to students' social mobility. Duquesne is a member of the U.S. President's Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll with Distinction for its contributions to Pittsburgh and communities around the globe. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Princeton Review's Guide to Green Colleges acknowledge Duquesne's commitment to sustainability.