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Concert to Focus on Misunderstood Hungarian Composer

The City Music Center (CMC) of Duquesne University will take audience members on a journey this weekend toward understanding a Hungarian composer known to be one of the most charismatic personalities of the romantic age.

As part of its new Adult Learning & Lecture (ALL) Series, the CMC will present Franz Liszt, Superstar! on Saturday, Sept. 23, at 2 p.m. in the PNC Recital Hall of the Mary Pappert School of Music.

Liszt, who began playing piano in concert halls by age nine, was a composer renowned throughout Europe for his influence and originality. He often gave away the proceeds from his concerts to charity and humanitarian causes, and he is recognized for creating what would become known as the symphonic poem.

The concert will feature Barbara Nissman, who is known as one of the last pianists in the grand Romantic tradition of Liszt and other similar composers. "Barbara Nissman continues the grand bravura tradition of romantic pianism, touching souls in the process," said CMC Director Tom Carsecka. "Nissman connects not only with the music and its composer, but connects the composer to the listener. She makes music relevant."

The ALL Series is designed to provide engaging educational experiences for adult learners interested in expanding their awareness and understanding of music and its impact (past, present, and future) on business, culture, politics and the ever changing social landscape.

Tickets for Franz Liszt, Superstar! are $15 and can be purchased online. Seating is limited.

Duquesne University

Founded in 1878, Duquesne is consistently ranked among the nation's top Catholic universities for its award-winning faculty and tradition of academic excellence. Duquesne, a campus of nearly 9,500 graduate and undergraduate students, has been nationally recognized for its academic programs, community service and commitment to sustainability. Follow Duquesne University on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
www.duq.edu