Center for Interpretive and Qualitative Research
(CIQR -- "seeker")*

Dr. Caroline Knowles
Reader in the Department of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Southampton, Hampshire, England
Public Lecture
"Four Journeys in Search for a Theory of Globalization"

Followed by a reception Symposium: "Home and Away: Maps of Territorial and Personal Expansion 1860-1867" Tuesday, October 22, 2002 Room 109 Union Building – Duquesne University 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 Noon

Professor Knowles is the author of Race and Social Analysis (London: Sage, 2003, forthcoming), Bedlam on the Streets (London: Routledge, 2000), Family Boundaries: The Invention of Normality and Dangerousness (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 1996), and Race Discourse and Labourism (London: Routledge, 1992). She is also co-editor of Identity, Representation, and Difference: Dialogues across Race and Gender (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2003, forthcoming), Picturing the Social Landscape (London: Routledge, 2004, forthcoming), and Resituating Identities: The Politics of Race, Ethnicity and Culture (Peterborough: Broadview Press, 1996). Her most recent articles are in European Journal of Women's Studies, Health and Place, and Sociological Review.

Minutes

At the Oct. 17 CIQR business meeting, CIQR members (25 in attendance) ratified the proposal for a certificate program in interpretive and qualitative research. After some minor revisions, the proposal will be sent again to the full CIQR membership for final comment. Other items discussed were: CIQR’s new status and improved finances (Fred Evans, Philosophy), CIQR participation in the June, 2003 Ethnographic and Qualitative Research Conference (Gary Shank, Education), and a CIQR panel on IRB requirements (Maureen O’Brien, Theology).

On Oct. 20, Dr. Caroline Knowles, Reader in the Department of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Southampton, Hampshire, England, gave her public lecture, "Four Journeys in Search for a Theory of Globalization," followed the next day by a symposium, "Home and Away: Maps of Territorial and Personal Expansion 1860-1897.” Around 45 people attended Professor Knowles’ interesting public lecture. The lecture was followed by a lively discussion. At the symposium, a smaller group engaged in intense discussion with Professor Knowles concerning qualitative method, social network theory, and specific themes raised in both her public lecture and the symposium material.