JD/MBA Joint Degree

Our JD-MBA Program gives you the tools to become successful, whether you aspire to be a business leader with legal expertise, or want to pursue a law career with a solid foundation in management. You may earn both the Juris Doctor and a MBA in four years rather than the usual five. Part-time students may also benefit from these programs. Our program enables you to follow the career path of your choice and provides you with a skill set and professional networks that truly differentiates you from others.

You can choose to begin your study in either the Palumbo-Donahue School of Business or in the Thomas R. Kline School of Law of Duquesne University.

• For full-time JD students, the first year of study in the Duquesne Kline School of Law is taken solely in the Duquesne Kline School of Law.

• The remainder of the programs may be taken jointly in both schools.

• Candidates must begin their study in the Duquesne Kline School of Law prior to substantially completing the requirements for the master's degree.

Credit Requirements


Specific course requirements and limitations may be obtained from either Admissions Office.

• 17 credit hours of course work are permitted per semester

• 6 credit hours may be permitted for a Duquesne Kline School of Law clinical course

• Daytime law students must be enrolled in ten or more credit hours of law classes in the fall and spring semesters. Evening law students must be enrolled in eight or more credit hours of law classes in the fall and spring semesters

• Students are required to provide the Duquesne Kline School of Law Registrar with a copy of their MBA elective course schedule

How to Apply


Students may begin their study in either the School of Business or the Duquesne Kline School of Law. However, students must apply and be accepted to both programs of study.

In addition to satisfying Professional MBA admission requirements, JD/MBA candidates must submit a recommendation from the Duquesne Kline School of Law registrar. This recommendation is requested through the application portal and will be used to ensure that applicants have completed the Petition for Joint Degree form and received approval from the Duquesne Kline School of Law Academic Status Committee. This recommendation will fulfill one of the two required recommendations.

Tuition Information


While the student is enrolled in both the JD and MBA programs, the JD program will take priority and the Law tuition rate will apply to any term during which the student is enrolled in Law courses. During any term when the student is enrolled in only MBA courses, the Graduate Business tuition rate will apply.

 

Program Type

Dual Degree

Degree

Master's

JD Courses

3 credit hours

Required Course: First Year Students Fall Semester Course

Requirement: exam This course is the first semester of a year-long course that will examine the procedures used in civil litigation, with an emphasis on litigation in federal courts. Topics covered include framing claims in the complaint, responding to the claims in an answer or motion, amending pleadings, joinder of claims and parties, discovery, summary dispositions, and trial concepts. The course also covers notice, personal jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction, venue, and claim issue preclusion. In addition to learning about these procedural concepts, the course will include practical drafting exercises, including drafting a complaint and an answer, and drafting discovery documents. 
Lecture.

 2 credit hours

Required Course: first year students Spring Semester Prerequisite: Civil Procedure and Drafting I Course Requirement: exam This course is the continuation of Civil Procedure and Drafting I. Lecture.

5 credit hours

Legal Research and Writing I(3 cr.)
Required Course: First Year Students Fall Semester This is the fall semester course in a sequence of two courses required of all first-year students. The course is taught in small sections; students will have the same professor for both semesters. Emphasis is placed on issue identification, problem solving, case analysis and synthesis, statutory interpretation, effective legal writing style, print-based and online research, and professionalism. At least three research-based predictive writing assignments will be assigned, leading to the preparation of law-office memoranda. Faculty members confer individually with students on these assignments, and several papers are revised after faculty critiques. Additional shorter writing assignments may also be assigned. Lecture.

Legal Research and Writing II: (2 cr.)
Required Course: First Year Students Spring Semester Prerequisite: Legal Research and Writing I This is the spring semester course in a sequence of two courses required of all first-year students. The course is taught in small sections; students will have the same professor for both semesters. The spring course builds upon the fall course; students will continue to refine the legal writing, analysis, and research techniques learned in the fall semester. Emphasis is placed on persuasive writing, advocacy, and compliance with court rules through the preparation of an appellate brief and delivery of an appellate oral argument. Faculty members confer individually with students on their drafts of the appellate brief and train students to deliver an effective appellate oral argument. Additional shorter writing assignments may also be assigned. Lecture.
3 credit hours

Required Course: first year full-time day students- spring semester, second year part-time day and evening- fall semester Course Requirement: exam This course examines statutory definitions of crimes, judicial interpretations of statutes, as well as theories of punishment. Requirements for criminal liability including voluntary act, culpability, and causation will be examined. Theories of liability applicable to all crimes, such as attempt, complicity, conspiracy, and solicitation will be considered. A variety of crimes will be considered with particular emphasis on crimes against the person. Various defenses, including self-defense, defense of others, duress, entrapment and double jeopardy will also be considered. Lecture.
5 credit hours

Torts I: (3 credit hours)
Required Course: First Year Students Fall Semester Course Requirement: exam Tort law, in general, is a body of law that allocates and distributes losses from harm and injury suffered by members of society in situations where there is no private agreement that determines who should bear the loss. Torts I covers two broad areas of liability: liability for intentional acts and liability for negligent conduct. The course covers the elements of basic causes of action within these regimes, as well as potential defenses. Lecture.

Torts II: (2 credit hours)
Required Course: First Year Students Spring Semester Prerequisite: Torts I Course Requirement: exam Torts II introduces students to a third foundational concept within tort law: liability without fault (strict liability). It also explores various advanced topics in torts, including limited duty situations, multiple tortfeasors, misrepresentation, nuisance, defamation, economic torts, strict liability for damage done by animals and abnormally dangerous activities, and products liability. Lecture.
6 credit hours

Contract I(3 cr.)
Required Course: First Year Students Fall Semester Course Requirement: exam Contracts I: Formation introduces students to law practice and policy by exploring the creation of agreements that courts will enforce. Specific topics include consideration, mutual assent (offer and acceptance), and defenses thereto (including the statute of frauds). Substantively, students learn legal doctrine as described in the Restatement (Second) of Contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code Art. 2. Procedurally, students learn how to analyze legal situations by operating rules on facts and to express this analysis in structured writing. Classroom lessons are augmented with online learning modules, formative assessments, practice problems, and model answers. Lecture.

Contract II:  (3 cr.)
Required Course: First Year Students Spring Semester Prerequisite: Contracts I Course Requirement: exam Contracts II: Interpretation builds on Contracts I (formation of agreements that courts will enforce) by exploring the meaning of agreements. Substantive topics include: express terms (ambiguity, extrinsic evidence, the Parole Evidence Rule), implied terms (intentions, good faith, satisfaction), express conditions (precedent, subsequent, satisfaction), implied conditions (independent, dependent, mutual), performance (partial, total), breach (substantial, venial, renunciation, repudiation), excuse (impossibility, frustration, impracticability), damages (expectation, reliance, restitution, liquidated, punitive), and equitable remedies. Procedurally, students learn to distinguish between legal categories and to write essays explaining the legal arguments thereto. Classroom lessons are augmented with online learning modules, formative assessments, practice problems, and model answers. The final exam is not cumulative with Contracts I. Lecture.
6 credit hours

Property I:  (3 cr.)
Required Course: First Year Students Fall Semester Course Requirement: exam Property I is an introduction to the study of law and fundamental legal skills through the lens of property law. Students will be introduced to the policies and philosophical theories underlying the law of property, the historical development of property law, the meaning of property, and the relativity of title. Acquisition of property interests and division of property interests into present, future, and concurrent interests are discussed. Although students are introduced to both real and personal property, the primary focus of the course is the law of real property. The course also introduces fundamental skills required for the practice of law, including briefing cases, issue identification, formulating rule statements and analyzing legal issues. Lecture.

Property II:  (3 cr.)
Required Course: First Year Students Spring Semester Prerequisite: Property I Course Requirement: exam Incorporating and building upon the concepts learned in Property I, Property II introduces students to modern real property transactions. Emphasis is placed upon the transfer of property interests, title assurance, mortgages and other methods of financing property transactions, and private restrictions on land use. The course also builds upon the fundamental skills introduced in Property I, including briefing cases, issue identification, formulating rule statements, and analyzing legal issues. Lecture.
5 credit hours

Constitutional Law I:  (2 cr.)
Required Course: Upper Division Students Course Requirement: exam Required: Fall semester of the second year for all students This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of Federal Constitutional Law. Emphasis is placed upon both structural constitutional law, that is, the law that constitutes the government, and protection of individual rights and liberties, including the examination of due process, equal protection and the First Amendment. Where pertinent, portions of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and its interpretation by the Pennsylvania courts are also discussed. 
Lecture.

Constitutional Law II:  (3 cr.)
Required Course: Upper Division Students Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I Course Requirement: exam Required: Spring semester of the second year for all students This course provides a full coverage of the topic of individual rights and liberties, including the examination of due process, equal protection and the First Amendment. Where pertinent, portions of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and its interpretation by the Pennsylvania courts are also discussed. Lecture.
3 credit hours

Formerly Corporations Required Course: Upper Division Students Course Requirement: exam Business Associations (“BA”) surveys the law governing “Firms,” which are business organizations such as partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies. BA requires students to have a fundamental working knowledge of legal principles in general (learned in the first year of law school), but this course neither requires nor assumes that students have any background in accounting, economics, finance, management, or any other business background. BA addresses the legal considerations associated with planning, forming, financing, owning, managing, transferring, dissolving, restructuring, and suing the Firm. BA reviews the legal rights and fiduciary duties of people related to the Firm, including: principals and agents; partners, limited partners, and limited liability partners; members and managers of limited liability companies; corporate shareholders, directors, and officers; and other stakeholders in society. BA examines how legal mechanisms may be used to enforce legal rights, duties, and equity regarding Firms. This study of statutory law, common law, contract law, federal securities rules and regulations, and various policy considerations underlying business associations is valuable for the bar and various types of law practice. BA considers professional and ethical concerns for attorneys who advise and interact with different Firms, including their own Law Firm. Students benefit from this course not only by learning the law of business organizations who might become their clients or with whom their clients will interact, but also by learning how the law of business applies to the business of the practice of law. BA encourages students to develop their own professional identifies while studying business ethics and the role of the Firm in society. Lecture.
3 credit hours

Required Course: Upper Division Students Required: Fall semester of second year for day division students and Fall semester of third year for evening and part-time division students Course Requirement: exam An analysis of the nature of judicial proof and a study of the theory and application of the rules regulating the admission and exclusion of testimonial and documentary proof by judicial tribunals in adversary and non-adversary proceedings. Consideration is given to the Federal Rules of Evidence for U.S. Courts and Magistrates. Lecture.
3 credit hours

Required Course: Upper Division Students Required: Fall semester of the final year Course Requirement: exam This course, mandated by the American Bar Association as a part of its accrediting function, reviews the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and, particularly, Pennsylvania State Law variants. While the course coverage is directed toward the multi-state professional responsibility examination, we will explore those deeper issues and strains associated with successful legal practice as an ethical lawyer. The course will also include sessions on addiction problems of the profession. Lecture.
2 credit hours

Required Course: Upper Division Students Required: Fall or Spring semester of the final year Course Requirement: exam The course provides an introduction to the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) with a concentration on the Sales Article, Article 2. Related statutes such as the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CCISG) and the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act are also introduced. The course analyzes express and implied warranties, the cumulation and conflict of warranties and the disclaimer of warranties as well as limitations of remedy and failure of essential purpose. Rejection, acceptance and revocation of acceptance are carefully explored along with prospective nonperformance and adequate assurances of performance. The coverage of risk allocation includes risk of loss, the concept of Identification and casualty to identified goods, commercial impracticability and excusable nonperformance. The last portion of the course is devoted to a detailed analysis of buyer and seller remedies under the UCC with particular attention to a clear understanding of direct, incidental and consequential damages. Throughout the course CISG applications are identified when they differ substantially from UCC applications. Lecture.
36-37 credit hours

Curriculum and Course Descriptions

1.5 credit hours

This course provides graduate business students with an introduction to fundamentals of accounting for corporations.  Topics will include the accounting cycle, an introduction to the basic financial statements of a corporation and determinations of corporate profitability and solvency.
1.5 credit hours

The course is a prerequisite for ECON 520 and covers introductory topics in both microeconomics and macroeconomics.
1.5 credit hours

Financial Management is about decisions firms make in two broad areas: the investments it makes and how it pays for them. The first involves expenditures for physical capital, human capital, technological capability, brand capital, and so forth. The second involves raising money in financial markets. In business decision making, the objective is to maximize shareholder wealth. Why the emphasis on shareholders? Among stakeholders generally (i.e., customers, employees, suppliers, government, communities, etc.), shareholders alone possess a uniquely comprehensive and long-term view of the firm’s viability as an ongoing enterprise.  This perspective arises from the residual nature of shareholders’ claim to earnings and assets.  Wealth is created when the return from investing business resources exceeds their opportunity cost. 
FINC 501 Finance Fundamentals provides an introduction to fundamental topics which are prerequisite for FINC 530 Financial Management:
• Financial Statements and Ratio Analysis
• Financial Statement Forecasting
• Time Value of Money

PR: ACCT 501
1.5 credit hours

This course provides the necessary foundation in probability and statistics necessary for students looking to go on to study the application of statistics to business. In this course, students will learn the rules of probability, how to identify and use common probability distributions, and how to conduct basic hypothesis tests.
3 credit hours

In this course, students will learn how to apply statistical methods of inference, produce and interpret statistics that attempt to answer typical business questions, and use probability theory and statistical methods to draw conclusions. Students are required to arrive having a working understanding of basic probability and statistics up through and including hypothesis testing. This course places heavy emphasis on the application of statistical techniques to business problems and the interpretation of results for a non-technical audience.
PR: STAT 501
1.5 credit hours

The primary responsibility of all managers is to make decisions in situations in which there are multiple competing objectives. This course introduces students to a set of tools that can be applied to scenarios in a variety of business environments. Specifically, this set of tools will include data summarization, data visualization, optimization methods, Monte Carlo simulation, multi-criteria decision analysis, and decision trees. Subsequent courses in the program will utilize these analytical methods within their specific decision environments.
PR or CONCURRENT: STAT 501
1.5 credit hours

Managing People for Sustained Competitive Advantage:  (1.5 cr.)
This course examines the ways in which leaders, managers, and employees can improve employee performance and commitment – key factors underlying competitive organizations. Guided by an examination of contemporary research and real-world cases, students will develop the knowledge and tools needed to help them navigate the opportunities and challenges inherent in managing themselves and others to generate enduring social and financial value, while incorporating long-term sustainable business objectives into the vision for the firm.

Employee Benefits:  (1.5 cr.) - 2 credits on University catalog Prerequisite: Basic Federal income Taxation is strongly recommended Course Requirement: exam Fulfills Concentration Elective: Business Law, Family Law, Labor & Employment Law, Tax & Estate Planning This course analyzes the tax and labor laws governing employee benefits plans. Students will examine (a) the principal types of retirement plans (including defined benefit pension plans, profit sharing plans, 401(k)/401(m) plans and employee stock ownership plans) and the requirements that these plans must meet in order to obtain favorable tax treatment; (b) issues related to stock-based compensation arrangements such as grants of restricted stock, stock appreciation rights and stock options; and (c) issues arising in connection with the maintenance of employee welfare benefit plans, with a particular emphasis on health plans and severance plans. Significant attention will be paid to the fiduciary requirements and enforcement provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”). Successful completion of Basic Federal Income Taxation is strongly recommended. Lecture.
3 credit hours

This course provides graduate business students with a deeper understanding of the accounting cycle used in companies to produce both internal and external financial information.  Special emphasis is placed throughout the course on understanding, analyzing and interpreting financial statements and related information.  Additionally, students will be introduced to decision making tools such as ratio analysis and challenged to utilize them to critically evaluate financial information and make effective decisions.  The basics of corporate sustainability reporting will also be covered.  Prerequisite: Online Accounting Module to be completed prior to ACCT 715; material to be tested in ACCT 715.
3 credit hours

The course covers selected topics in microeconomics. It emphasizes the integration of microeconomic theories and tools from a managerial perspective. The applied aspect of the course comes from analyzing case studies and studying empirical evidence of the theories. Topics include both traditional topics in microeconomics (quantitative demand analysis, elasticities, production and costs, market structures and profit maximization), in addition to advanced topics (game theory and pricing strategies).   CO or PR: STAT 510
1.5 credit hours

The purpose of this course is to provide business professionals with the knowledge needed to manage and utilize information systems and technology within a business organization.  As information systems have become critical to the success of modern business organizations, knowledge of information systems has become a key success factor for all business professionals within the organization. This course provides comprehensive and integrative coverage of essential new technologies, information system applications, and their impact on business models.  Moreover, this course emphasizes the conceptualization of information systems as structured technology configurations working collectively to serve the information needs of an organization.
1.5 credit hours

Supply Chain Management (SCM) is the business process that has evolved from the integration of the traditional business disciplines of forecasting, demand planning, materials planning, purchasing, production, operations management, transportation, inventory management, warehousing, packaging, materials handling, customer service, and related information systems.  SCM focuses on efficient and effective customer satisfaction from the exchange of goods, services and information to complete the business transaction from supplier’s supplier to customer’s customer. This course provides insight into the goals and best practices of each business discipline included in the SCM process, and how these disciplines integrate to ensure a competitive advantage and corporate success.  Students will assess industry specific differences in managing the flow of materials, goods, services, information and cash via the processes, technologies, and facilities that link primary suppliers through to ultimate customers for both service and product industries.
3 credit hours

Financial Management is about decisions firms make in two broad areas: the investments it makes and how it pays for them. The first involves expenditures for physical capital, human capital, technological capability, brand capital, and so forth. The second involves raising money in financial markets. In business decision making, the objective is to maximize shareholder wealth. Why the emphasis on shareholders? Among stakeholders generally (i.e., customers, employees, suppliers, government, communities, etc.), shareholders alone possess a uniquely comprehensive and long-term view of the firm’s viability as an ongoing enterprise.  This perspective arises from the residual nature of shareholders’ claim to earnings and assets.  Wealth is created when the return from investing business resources exceeds their opportunity cost. 
FINC 530 Financial Management provides an advanced discussion of the analytical techniques used to assess the impact of business decisions on shareholder value.  The course covers these topics:
• Valuation—stocks, bonds, corporate valuation
• Interest rates and financial markets
• Investment decision making (capital budgeting analysis)
• Risk, return and the opportunity cost of capital
• Market efficiency
• Capital structure

PR: FINC 501, ACCT 515, STAT 510, GRBU 503
PR or CONCURRENT: ECON 520
3 credit hours

This course examines the role of marketing in creating exchanges that satisfy consumer and organizational objectives thereby creating value for the firm.  The course focuses on formulating and evaluating marketing strategies.  Students learn how marketing mix decisions – product, place, promotion and price – are made as part of a cohesive strategy.  Contemporary concepts and theories will be presented with a focus on analytical and financial models that will assist marketing managers in making better decisions.  Emerging perspectives on strategic sustainability, marketing management and the impact of digital media are also emphasized.
PR: ECON 501
1.5 credit hours

Strategic sustainability advances students’ managerial skills for identifying, researching, evaluating and communicating innovative opportunities involving the efficient and effective management of financial, social, and environmental resources.
 
Building on our commitment to the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME), this course experience serves as a foundation for strategic sustainability, models and tools across the curriculum. 

Students work individually, and in teams to frame problems, research and develop training seminars, and manage resources for assigned topics.  The focus is inspiring innovation, and creating competitive advantage – both short and long term – for organizations.  Deliverables include presentations of mini training seminars to peer, analytical life cycle assessment along with participation in class discussions while applying critical thinking to identify productivity gains, cost savings, revenue increases, and profit growth when implementing sustainable business practices. 

The course is taught as a seminar where sharing learning, best practices and sustainability knowledge across teams and individuals enables all to gain insight to emerging issues beyond the scope of a single entity. Students work within an integrated curriculum to analyze internal/external situations, drivers and risks; to identify problems and opportunities; to evaluate return on investment from alternative courses of action; and to value both short- and long-term prosperity.  Students independently learn about, apply, and reflect on proven models and methodologies while honing their skills as a researcher, analyst, writer, and speaker. 
PR: GRBU 503
1.5 credit hours  
Global Business:  (1.5 cr.)
This course focuses on the global environment of contemporary business. Students will consider the rationale for conducting business internationally and the various issues that complicated decision making in a global context. The course will pay specific attention to the cultural, social, environmental, and legal differences that affect international transactions and the development of collaborative partnerships.

International Law:  (3 cr.) 
Elective Course Course Requirement: exam Fulfills Current Concentration Elective: Business Law- Corporate Governance and Transactions Track, Government and Public Interest- Basic Government Track This course is designed to introduce the student to international law through the examination of such matters as the nature and sources of international law (including the role of treaties, custom, and natural law), the relationship between international law and municipal law, the operation of international law on states and individuals, the role of international organizations, and international conflict of laws. Lecture.
3 credit hours

This is a dynamic course that provides an overview of executive leadership and opportunities to interact with senior managers.  The course draws on the collective experience and wisdom of distinguished business leaders who visit the class to provide students with executive perspectives on the challenges associated with thinking entrepreneurially, strategic leadership, developing a vision and motivating organizational change.  Students use a variety of conceptual frameworks in leadership and related areas to assess and evaluate these “executive insights” (e.g., via papers and projects) with an eye toward developing their own leadership skills, particularly their ability to seize opportunities and create effective solutions for the contemporary challenges facing business leaders.
3 credit hours

This course addresses the process of planning and implementing business strategies. In order to develop a future direction for an organization, this class builds on the formulation of a company’s mission, industry analysis, an organization’s internal assessment, innovation, and strategic planning. This course emphasizes corporate governance, sustainability, and ethics in strategic management.
3 credit hours

The second half of our integrative capstone sequence, the Capstone Project involves students teams working with a real company client to develop  a set of strategic recommendations for advancing the business.   In this course, students will assess the firm’s strategic context and diagnose its internal operations as well as its products and/or services as they relate to customer needs.  In doing so, students will experience what it is like to make high-stakes and impactful recommendations to top management under time pressure and with high expectations for quality and analysis.  Final deliverables for each team include a detailed report that lays out specific action steps and metrics (e.g., for productivity gains, cost savings, increased revenues/profit growth) as well as a sophisticated presentation to company management that highlights the team’s analysis and recommendations.  
PR or CO MGMT 540
1.5 credit hours  

Business Associations:  (3 cr.)  
Formerly Corporations Required Course: Upper Division Students Course Requirement: exam Business Associations (“BA”) surveys the law governing “Firms,” which are business organizations such as partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies. BA requires students to have a fundamental working knowledge of legal principles in general (learned in the first year of law school), but this course neither requires nor assumes that students have any background in accounting, economics, finance, management, or any other business background. BA addresses the legal considerations associated with planning, forming, financing, owning, managing, transferring, dissolving, restructuring, and suing the Firm. BA reviews the legal rights and fiduciary duties of people related to the Firm, including: principals and agents; partners, limited partners, and limited liability partners; members and managers of limited liability companies; corporate shareholders, directors, and officers; and other stakeholders in society. BA examines how legal mechanisms may be used to enforce legal rights, duties, and equity regarding Firms. This study of statutory law, common law, contract law, federal securities rules and regulations, and various policy considerations underlying business associations is valuable for the bar and various types of law practice. BA considers professional and ethical concerns for attorneys who advise and interact with different Firms, including their own Law Firm. Students benefit from this course not only by learning the law of business organizations who might become their clients or with whom their clients will interact, but also by learning how the law of business applies to the business of the practice of law. BA encourages students to develop their own professional identifies while studying business ethics and the role of the Firm in society. Lecture.
1.5 credit hours 

Professional Responsibility:  (3 cr.)  
Required Course: Upper Division Students Required: Fall semester of the final year Course Requirement: exam This course, mandated by the American Bar Association as a part of its accrediting function, reviews the ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct and, particularly, Pennsylvania State Law variants. While the course coverage is directed toward the multi-state professional responsibility examination, we will explore those deeper issues and strains associated with successful legal practice as an ethical lawyer. The course will also include sessions on addiction problems of the profession. Lecture.
BLAW 529 Business Legal Environment (1.5 credit hours) 
Substituted by LAWS 167 Business Associations

MGMT 523 Applied Business Ethics 
Substituted by LAWS C19 Professional Responsibility


*These courses may be waived based on previous coursework.

** Course may count as a law school elective