Master's in Biomedical Sciences (MBS)

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Be prepared to transform the world with Duquesne's Master's in Biomedical Sciences (MBS). Built to help you advance your career in medicine through a greater understanding of the structure and function of the human body, this master's program is the only one in the world using HoloAnatomy 3D technology!

The MBS Program

Professionals with advanced degrees are needed in healthcare and biomedical research today, and in the future as these fields evolve and expand. This Master's in Biomedical Sciences degree program offers:

  • Easy application process with no MCAT/GRE requirement
  • Convenient full-time, 10-month program (32-credit hours)
  • Hands-on learning experiences and community outreach opportunities  

The MBS Coursework

You'll have a competitive edge and be prepared to demonstrate your ability to succeed in medical school or any health profession with Duquesne's MS Biomedical Sciences. Our faculty will work alongside you with coursework that combines biomedical sciences and clinical application with hands-on learning opportunities that:

  • Expands your scientific knowledge with first-semester medical school courses.
  • Explores anatomy system-by-system with 3D mixed reality system, HoloAnatomy.
  • Integrates service opportunities that impacts the health of Pittsburgh communities.
  • Hones critical thinking skills to quickly solve clinical issues.
  • Prepares medical school candidates for MCAT exam.

Application & Prerequisite Requirements

Start your MS Biomedical Sciences application today-it only takes 15 minutes! Review more information about the Graduate Admissions process.   

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Application Requirements

  • Master's in Biomedical Sciences applicants are selected on a rolling admission's schedule.
  • No MCAT/GRE is required.
  • Bachelor's degree with a required minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 and a science GPA of 2.75.
  • Two letters of reference. Letters for the MBS program may be obtained from an employer, science professor, pre-health committee or advisor, or health professional(s) familiar with your academic ability.

Prerequisite Coursework Requirements

  • Biological Sciences - 8 credit hours
  • Physics - 8 credit hours
  • General and/or Inorganic Chemistry - 8 credit hours
  • Organic Chemistry - 8 credit hours
  • English and/or Composition - 8 credit hours

Additional preferred coursework (not required):

  • Biomedical Sciences - 6 credit hours (200 level or above)
  • Coursework may include: anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, virology and genetics.
  • Other coursework may be accepted.

Program Information

A Master's in Biomedical Sciences (MBS) degree from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA will prepare you for medical school or an advanced healthcare career in 10-months.

Program Type

Major

Degree

Master's

Duration

10 months

Required Credit Hours

32

Contact Us

You have plans for medical school or advancement in your current healthcare career, we can help you get there. Contact us directly with any questions about the program or admissions process.

MBS Course Descriptions

You'll be prepared to meet your goals with these Fall and Spring courses.

This is a regional-based anatomy course that delivers the knowledge necessary to understand and apply human anatomy, histology, and embryonic development to normal human physiology and pathophysiology. Students will study human anatomy of the upper and lower extremities, back, and thorax. The course will utilize lectures and HoloAnatomy laboratories.

3 credits, Fall semester

This course aims to provide an understanding of the functions of the body at the level of tissues and organs to provide a foundation for further exploration of disease processes. The topics covered in this course include musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, and pulmonary systems. 

3 credits, Fall semester

This course aims to provide an understanding of the functions of the body at cellular and sub-cellular levels to provide a foundation for further exploration of disease processes. The course will examine the biochemical activity of the cell and demonstrate understanding of the cellular structure, nucleic acid structure and function, synthesis of proteins, regulation of gene expression, the function of cellular organelles, and cellular metabolism.  

3 credits, Fall semester

The purpose of this course is to provide the foundational knowledge and framework of the major classes of bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi and how they relate to the pathologic basis of disease. The structure, replication, and management of these microbes as well as host-pathogen interactions are discussed.

2 credits, Fall semester

This course provides the fundamentals of the immune system.  The focus will be on innate and adaptive immunity, immune responses to pathogens and other foreign materials, and dysregulation of the immune system.

2 credits, Fall semester

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a comprehensive foundation in general chemistry, organic chemistry, general biology, biochemistry, physics, psychology and sociology. The course will also focus on the development of critical analysis and reasoning skills.

3 credits, Fall semester

This is a regional-based anatomy course that delivers the knowledge necessary to understand and apply human anatomy, histology, and embryonic development to normal human physiology and pathophysiology.  Students will study human anatomy of the abdomen, pelvis, head, and neck. The course will utilize lectures and HoloAnatomy laboratories.

3 credits, Spring semester

This course aims to provide an understanding of the functions of the body at the level of tissues and organs to provide a foundation for further exploration of disease processes.  The topics covered in this course include renal, digestive, and endocrine systems. 

3 credits, Spring semester

This course provides the foundational knowledge and framework to apply the principles of pharmacology needed in evidence-based medicine.  The course covers the foundational concepts of pharmacology including pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, major classes of drugs, and their purposes and mechanisms in the rational treatment of disease.

3 credits, Spring semester

The purpose of this course is to build upon the foundations of anatomy, physiology, cell biology, immunology, microbiology, and pharmacology to explore mechanisms of disease initiation, progression, and outcomes. The changes in structure and function of cells, tissues, and organs will be examined as they relate to disease, injury, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. 

2 credits, Spring semester  

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundational framework for scholarship in the health sciences. The foundations of this course are clinical study design, responsible conduct in research, the scientific method, the research process and methodology, literature searches, and biostatistics. In addition, this course will explore the topics of epidemiology, social determinants of health, analyzing relationships between variables, proper methods of reading and learning from scientific literature and applying information from clinical literature. 

2 credits, Spring semester

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a comprehensive foundation in general chemistry, organic chemistry, general biology, biochemistry, physics, psychology and sociology.  The course will also focus on the development of critical analysis and reasoning skills.

3 credits, Spring semester

Faculty Spotlight

John M. Kauffman, Jr., DO, FACOI, FACP

John M. Kauffman, Jr., DO, FACOI, FACP

Founding Dean, College of Osteopathic Medicine

Amber Fedin, DO

Amber Fedin, DO

Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs and Associate Professor of Family Medicine, College of Osteopathic Medicine

M. Renee Prater, DVM, PhD

M. Renee Prater, DVM, PhD

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Osteopathic Medicine

Jason E. Wells, PhD

Jason E. Wells, PhD

Associate Dean for Biomedical Affairs, College of Osteopathic Medicine