Jacqueline Pike

PwC Alumni Faculty Fellow in Information Systems Management, Associate Professor of Information Systems and Technology
Palumbo Donahue School of Business
Information Systems and Technology

933 Rockwell Hall
Phone: 412.396.1875
pikej@duq.edu

Education:

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
B.B.A., Ohio University's Honors Tutorial College
Biography

Jacqueline C. Pike, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Information Systems and Technology in the Palumbo Donahue School of Business at Duquesne University. Pike coordinates and teaches the information systems introductory core course, Business Information Systems. She also teaches Database and Information Management at the undergraduate and graduate levels. In 2011, Pike received the Ohio Faculty Innovator Award along with her teammates for their efforts in developing an engaging, informative, and cost-effective introductory information systems course.

In her research, Pike studies emerging technology and how different user groups engage it to accomplish tasks. Her current research interests include behavior in public online communities and social computing environments, the utilization of public online communities and mass collaboration systems by organizations, and the visual display of information in a systems context. Pike has conducted research related to Facebook, LinkedIn, and Wikipedia.

Pike earned her Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh and her B.B.A. from Ohio University's Honors Tutorial College. Prior to joining the faculty, she worked with Microsoft as a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional, and she worked for a number of corporations in IT-related positions. While one can frequently find Pike in her office, when she is taking a break she likes to walk her dog, Rupert, and devise new recipes in her kitchen.

Publications

Refereed Articles

Basic or Discovery Scholarship:

Pike, J. C., Bateman, P. J., & Butler, B. S. (in press, 2017). Information from social networking sites: Context collapse and ambiguity in the hiring process. Information Systems Journal.

Pike, J. C., Joyce, E. W., & Butler, B. S. (in press, 2016). Overcoming Transience and Flux: Routines in Community-Governed Mass Collaborations. Information Technology & People.

Joyce, E., Pike, J. C., & Butler, B. S. (2013). Rules and Roles vs. Consensus: Self-Governed Mass Collaborative Deliberative Bureaucracies. American Behavioral Scientist, 57 (5), 576-594.

Pike, J. C., Bateman, P. J., & Butler, B. S. (2013). Dialectic Tensions of Information Quality: Social Networking Sites and Hiring. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 19 (1), 56-77.

Bateman, P. J., Pike, J. C., Berente, N., & Hansen, S. (2012). Time for a Post-Mortem?: Business Professionals' Perspectives on the Disillusionment of Virtual Worlds. Journal of Virtual Worlds Research, 5 (3), 1-15.

Bateman, P. J., Keillor, B. C., Pike, J. C., & Butler, B. S. (2011). Social marketing: lessons for managing social media initiatives. Innovative Marketing, 7 (3), 73-81.

Berente, N., Hansen, S., Pike, J. C., & Bateman, P. J. (2011). Seeking the Organizational Value of Virtual Worlds: Patterns of Discursive Sensemaking of an Innovative Technological Environment. Mis Quarterly, 35 (3), 685-710.

Bateman, P. J., Pike, J. C., & Butler, B. S. (2011). To Disclose or Not: Publicness in Social Networking Sites. Information Technology & People, 24 (1), 78-100.

Hansen, S., Berente, N., Pike, J. C., & Bateman, P. J. (2009). Productivity and Play in Organizations: Executive Perspectives on the Real-World Organizational Value of Immersive Virtual Environments. Artifact, 2 (3), 1-13.

Teaching and Learning Scholarship:

Pike, J. C., Spangler, W., Williams, V., & Kollar, R. (2017). Role-Playing and Problem-Based Learning: The Use of Cross-Functional Student Teams in Business Application Development. Information Systems Education Journal, 15 (4).

Hartzel, K. S., & Pike, J. C. (2015). Live, Model, Learn: Experiencing Information Systems Requirements through Simulation. Information Systems Education Journal.

Frost, R., Pike, J. C., & Kenyo, L. (2008). Generating Student Interest in the Information Systems Major: A Strategic Framework for the Introductory Course. Issues in Information Systems, IX (1), 188-195.

Frost, R., Pike, J. C., & Huang, W. (2005). Breaking Down the Blocking Boundary of Separated IS Courses in IS Curriculum: A Case Study. Issues in Information Systems, VI (1), 303-309.

Frost, R., & Pike, J. C. (2004). A Revolutionary Approach to Introductory MIS: Professional, Project Based, Decision Focuses, Visual, and Engaging. Issues in Information Systems, V (2), 454-460.

Refereed Proceedings

Basic or Discovery Scholarship:

Joyce, E., & Pike, J. C. (in press, 2017). Too Much Information: The Influence of User Self-Presentation on Success in Mass Collaboration. Americas Conference on Information Systems.

Pike, J. C., Joyce, E., & Bateman, P. J. (2013). Take a Look at My Wiki-ness: Examining Self-Presentation and Power in Mass Collaboration Systems. AIS Special Interest Group on Organizational Systems Research Association Pre-ICIS Workshop.

Joyce, E., Pike, J. C., & Butler, B. S. (2013). Keeping Eyes on the Prize: Officially Sanctioned Rule Breaking in Mass Collaboration Systems. ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW).

Pike, J. C., Bateman, P. J., & Butler, B. S. (2012). You Saw THAT?: Social Networking Sites, Self-Presentation, and Impression Formation in the Hiring Process. Americas Conference on Information Systems.

Butler, B. S., Ridings, C., & Pike, J. C. (2009). Growing Local Food Systems: Information Technology Use and Impacts in Geographically-Embedded Markets. International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS).

Pike, J. C., Bateman, P. J., & Butler, B. S. (2009). I Didn't Know You Could See That: The Effect of Social Networking Environment Characteristics on Publicness and Self-Disclosure. Americas Conference on Information Systems.

Galletta, D., Haney, M., Chung, T., Pike, J. C., & Polak, P. (2007). Does Our Web Site Stress You Out? Information Foraging and the Psycho-Physiology of Online Navigation. International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS).

Pike, J. C., Bateman, P. J., & Butler, B. S. (2007). Boundaries in Social Computing Environments: The Effect of Environment Characteristics on Publicness and Self-Disclosure. International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS).

Butler, B. S., Joyce, E., & Pike, J. C. (2007). Don't Look Now, But We've Created a Bureaucracy: The Nature and Roles of Policies and Rules in Wikipedia. SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Teaching and Learning Scholarship:

Pike, J., Spangler, W., Williams, V., & Kollar, R. (2016). The Use of Cross-Functional Student Teams in Business Application Development. EDSIGCon (Conference on Information Systems and Computing Education).

Non-Refereed Articles

Teaching and Learning Scholarship:

Williams, V., Pike, J., Kollar, R., & Spangler, W. (2015). PICPA's Challenge Bolsters Classroom Learning. Pennsylvania CPA Journal, 86 (3), 67.

Books, Monographs, Compilations, Manuals

Books:

Frost, R., Pike, J. C., Kenyo, L., & Lebovitz, S. (2016). Business Information Systems: Design an App for That, v. 2.0 (2 ed.). Flat World Knowledge.

Frost, R., Pike, J., Kenyo, L., & Pels, S. (2011). Business Information Systems: Design An App for That. Flat World Knowledge.

Presentations of Refereed Papers

International:

Pike, J. C. (2018). The Influence of Identification in User Self-Presentation on Success in Mass Collaboration. ACM Conference on Supporting Group Work, Sanibel Island, Florida.

Hartzel, K. S. & Pike, J. C. (2014, November). Live, Model, Learn: Experiencing Information Systems Requirements through Simulation. Information Systems Eduation Conference, Baltimore, Maryland.

Kane, A. A., Pike, J. C., & Argote, L. (2014, August). Knowledge Transfer across Geographically Distributed Units of a Service Organization. Cognition in the Rough at the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Joyce, E., Butler, B. S., & Pike, J. C. (2011). Handling Flammable Materials: Wikipedia Biographies of Living Persons as Contentious Objects. iConference, Seattle, Washington.

Ridings, C., Butler, B. S., & Pike, J. C. (2010). Food in Bloom: Cross Pollination and Cultivation of Food Systems, Cultures, and Methods. Information Technology, Identity, and Legitimacy in Local Food Systems, Bloomington, Indiana.

Berente, N., Hansen, S., Pike, J. C., & Bateman, P. J. (2009). Seeking the Organizational Value of Virtual Worlds: Patterns of Discursive Sensemaking of an Innovative Technological Environment. The Virtual World Conference, Austin, Texas.

Pike, J. C. (2008). Virtual Worlds and Real-Life Organizations: A Study of the Perspectives of Executives. Academy of Management, Anaheim, California.

Bateman, P. J. & Pike, J. C. (2007). Lurking in Online Communities: A Communication Apprehension Perspective. Academy of Management, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Grants

Research:

2011: Butler, B. S., Joyce, E., & Pike, J. C., HCC: Small: Collaborative Research: Seeing the Smoke Before the Fire - Predicting Policy Adaptation in Policy-Supported Mass Collaboration Systems, GOV-National Science Foundation (NSF).

2010: Butler, B. S., Joyce, E., & Pike, J. C., Collaborative Research: SoCS - Policy Application and Adaptation in Socially Intelligent Computing Systems, GOV-National Science Foundation (NSF).

 

Research Interests

My research focuses on emerging technologies and the behaviors surrounding the technologies. In general, I tend to ask questions regarding how the emerging technologies affect how people interact, make decisions, and comprehend information presented to them. My current efforts are focused on include social networking technology and mass collaboration systems.

In the area of social networking technology, my studies examine the publicness of social networking and how users change their behavior in light of the publicness. Currently I am examining the impact of boundary-blurring social networking websites in a hiring context and, in particular, focusing on the impression formed by recruiters when boundary-blurring social networking sites are viewed.

My research on mass collaboration systems, and in particular Wikipedia, focuses on policy systems and how the users manage the creation of product. Present studies examine rule-breaking in mass collaboration systems and how the users come to an agreement in an environment where rule-breaking is permitted. My co-authors and I are also working on a study of contentious objects in mass collaboration systems and how they can be managed. Contentious objects exist when multiple parties disagree about how the object should exist and are given a forum to express their disagreement. This work puts forth a new perspective on boundary objects, which can act to bring two or more parties together, by introducing contentious objects, which permanently act to divide two or more parties and create tension.