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Carnegie Science Center Honors Professor’s Efforts in Hazelwood

Duquesne University Associate Biology Professor Dr. Sarah Woodley will receive the 2019 Carnegie Science Award in the Postsecondary Educator category from the Carnegie Science Center.

Established in 1997, Carnegie Science Awards honor the accomplishments of innovators in the fields of science, technology and education whose contributions lead to significant economic or societal benefits for the western Pennsylvania region. The Science Center noted Woodley's community engagement, extending her role as a science educator beyond the classroom to the Hazelwood community.

Woodley combines community-engaged learning, novel research and science communication in the University's undergraduate research activities. Under her direction, Duquesne students translate science themes, such as water quality, into hands-on activities for students in Pittsburgh's underserved communities. In particular, she has partnered with the Center of Life in Hazelwood, working with kindergarten to eighth grade students in both after-school and summer programs. The University's undergraduates also mentor high school students in the laboratory.

"Our students gain an increased academic understanding of the subject, while improving their communication skills and raising awareness about the role of science throughout the community," Woodley said.

She will receive her award at the 23rd annual Carnegie Science Award celebration on May 10 at the Science Center's PPG Science Pavilion.

"I'm greatly honored to be selected for a Carnegie Science Award," said Woodley, who teaches in the Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences. "It's an exciting time to be a scientist and to share with students the important role science plays in our society. Through our outreach activities, we hope to educate the community about important environmental and health issues that affect not only them, but the world."

"The Carnegie Science Awards provide an opportunity to celebrate the remarkably talented individuals and organizations in our region's science community," said Jason Brown, Henry Buhl, Jr., interim director of the Science Center. "These innovators have had immeasurable impact on Pittsburgh's healthcare, manufacturing, energy, environmental and education industries. Their achievements, dedication, and perseverance are truly inspiring."

Duquesne University

Founded in 1878, Duquesne is consistently ranked among the nation's top Catholic universities for its award-winning faculty and tradition of academic excellence. Duquesne, a campus of nearly 9,500 graduate and undergraduate students, has been nationally recognized for its academic programs, community service and commitment to sustainability. Follow Duquesne University on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
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