SCALE WORKSHOPS

A series of 30-minute workshops designed to accommodate busy schedules. These micro-workshops highlight a teaching and learning topic and provide simple but effective strategies that can be incorporated into a course without much, if any, disruption of the course design. While these workshops are usually offered as thematic series, you do not need to attend all the sessions in a given series. The workshops focus on strategies that are:

  • Based on principles of learning
  • Known to benefit students (and teachers) equitably
  • Achievable by instructors in varied contexts
  • Open to creativity

This Semester's Workshop Series

Revisiting Teaching Basics Series

Whether you're a new instructor developing your craft or a tenured professor with years of experience, it is always vital to revisit the basics of teaching. These sessions offer the space to reflect on and examine various approaches at the core of teaching such as lecture styles, high-impact use of the first and last ten minutes of class, learning activities, and metacognition. 

Each mico-workshop will focus on one of these areas, offer examples to learn about and engage with, and then foster participant interaction and offer guidance on how to easily implement these approaches if desired. While these sessions are part of a series, they also cover distinct topics and you should feel free to attend as many or as few sessions as your schedule allows.

Session 1: Three Styles of Lecture

Date and Time: Wednesday, February 2nd, 2:00-2:30pm (via Zoom)

Every new semester is an opportunity to re-engage with the fundamentals of teaching. This session reflects on three common and unique styles of lecturing with details about the usefulness and limits of each. This micro-workshop is intended to get instructors to reflect on how to productively utilize and mix-up their lectures. A bulk of this session will be reserved for Q&A and discussion.

Registration online

Session 2: First and Last Ten Minutes of Class, Three Ways to Make the Most of Each

Date and Time: Tuesday, February 15th, 11:00-11:30am (via Zoom)

It can be easy to overlook how useful the first and last ten minutes of a class can be as a means to stimulate student learning. However, these openings and conclusions to your class time can be vital moments for students to form connections between class periods or operationalize what they learned in class during the rest of the meeting time. In this session, we'll review three ways to make the most of both of these opportunities for student engagement.

Registration online

Session 3: Three Engaging Learning Activities

Date and Time: Tuesday, March 29th, 12:15-12:45pm (via Zoom)

We know that students benefit from a range of different engaging activities, but many of us don't have the time to research the various kinds of engaging activities that could be used. This session will examine a few academic games and discuss the best ways to use them and how they can stimulate student learning and use of concepts. A bulk of this session time will be reserved for Q&A and discussion.

Registration online

Session 4: Three Metacognitive Classroom Practices

More information on this session coming soon.


Executive Skills Enable Effective Learning: A Micro-Series on How to Use, Model, and Teach Strong Executive Skills

There's a reason the self-help field is so successful. Gimmicky as "5 Ways to Turn Your Life Around" sounds, it's something that we all want: to function better and struggle less, but with as little effort as possible. After all, the whole problem is that we don't have enough time, so the solution needs to be quick-ideally an overnight change.

While self-help guides themselves may be dubious, they are rooted in research on executive skills. Executive skills are scientifically recognized cognitive abilities necessary for functioning and functioning well. There are 12 executive skills, categorized into 3 types of brain function: working memory, mental flexibility, and self-control. Improvement in these categories of executive skills is, sadly, not an overnight process. However, by putting in consistent effort to utilize tried and true methods that strengthen your executive skill sets, you can actually improve your functioning.

These skills are not only necessary for everyday functioning, they are also vital for learning. Teaching executive skills to your students and scaffolding them as they develop these abilities will help them succeed in your class (and thus make your life easier), as well as help them throughout their education and life outside of college.

This micro-series will highlight 4 executive skills: metacognition, time management, planning or organization, and self-control. Each session is a half hour in length and will highlight one of these skills through methods that you can use to improve your own use of the skill, you can use to model effective executive functioning, and you can use to teach students effective executive functioning on their own.

Session One: Maintaining Your Self-Control Skill Set

Date and Time: February 7th, 2022, 10-10:30 A.M. (via Zoom)

Session One of the Executive Skills Micro Series focuses on self-control and both growing and maintaining this skill set for yourself and for your students. Self-control involves regulating yourself and your ability to accomplish tasks. In addition to focusing on self-control as an executive skill, this session will also explore how to build strong habits and why building good habits is important. This foundation will help you to succeed in implementing the strategies we'll discuss on strengthening executive skills. This session will offer you concrete approaches for using self-control in your personal and professional lives, modeling self-control in the classroom, and teaching self-control while you teach your subject matter. After attending this session, you will have a toolbox of tried and true approaches for improving your students and your own self-control.

Register online

Session Two: Maintaining Your Metacognitive Skill Set

Date and Time: March 2nd, 2022, 11-11:30 A.M. (via Zoom)

Session Two of the Executive Skills Micro Series focuses on metacognition and both growing and maintaining this skill set for yourself and for your students. Metacognition is the ability to think about and reflect on how you learn and your thought processes. This session will offer you concrete approaches for using metacognitive skills in your personal and professional lives, modeling metacognition in the classroom, and teaching metacognition while you teach your subject matter. After attending this session, you will have a toolbox of tried and true approaches for improving your students and your own metacognitive skills.

Register online

Session Three: Maintaining Your Time Management Skill Set

Date and Time: March 30, 2022, 12-12:30 P.M. (via Zoom)

Session Three of the Executive Skills Micro Series focuses on time management and both growing and maintaining this skill set for yourself and for your students. Time management is the ability to prioritize tasks and finish projects in a timely manner, while balancing all of the tasks one is responsible for. This session will offer you concrete approaches for using time management skills in your personal and professional lives, modeling time management in the classroom, and teaching time management while you teach your subject matter. After attending this session, you will have a toolbox of tried and true approaches for improving your students and your own time management skills.

Register online

Session Four: Maintaining Your Organizational Skill Set

Date and Time: April 27, 2022, 1-1:30 P.M. (via Zoom)

Session Four of the Executive Skills Micro Series focuses on planning and organization and both growing and maintaining this skill set for yourself and for your students. Organizational skills are the ability to approach tasks in an efficient and orderly way, by ensuring preparedness and planning what the process will look like to reach completion. This session will offer you concrete approaches for using organizational skills in your personal and professional lives, modeling organizational skills in the classroom, and teaching organizational skills while you teach your subject matter. After attending this session, you will have a toolbox of tried and true approaches for improving your students and your own abilities to plan and organize.

Register online


Past Semester's (Fall 2021) Workshops

Trauma-Informed Pedagogy Micro-Workshop Series

Under the umbrella of our SCALE initiative, CTE is providing a series of micro-workshops on Trauma-Informed Pedagogy (TIP) and small changes that can be implemented to create better learning experiences. These strategies improve the classroom and university environment for all students and are especially helpful for students who have experienced, or are currently experiencing, trauma. While these sessions are part of a series, they also cover distinct topics and you should feel free to attend as many or as few sessions as your schedule allows.

Session 1: Trauma-Informed Pedagogy: What is it? Why use it? How to implement it?

Thursday, September 30 (1:45-2:15) via Zoom

Trauma-informed modalities have been around for nearly two decades but the pandemic has sparked a new interest in the field as schools work to address the new mental and emotional ramifications of being a student - and a teacher - that COVID-19 wrought. Trauma-Informed Pedagogy (TIP) encourages educators to examine how the academic process can be tweaked to create environments and assignments that are less prone to reactivate or induce trauma in both students and teachers. This session will serve as an introduction to principles of TIP, provide arguments for its viability, and examine ways that educators can begin shifting their courses to be more trauma-informed.

Register Online

Session 2: Providing Trauma-Informed Feedback: Three Ways to Build Islands of Competence

Tuesday, October 12 (3:30-4:00) via Zoom

Sometimes as educators we may forget how overwhelming it can be to receive a paper full of comments (digital or physical) or how frustrating it can be to receive positive seeming notes like "Great work!" that don't actually elaborate on why the work was so strong. On top of this, it's often quite difficult to formulate critical feedback for students that doesn't also risk instilling a fixed-mindset where students lose sight of the path to personal growth that education represents for all of us. This session will focus on the trauma-informed and strengths-based approach of building "islands of competence" while still providing the critical feedback students need.

Register Online

Session 3: Equitable Environments: Identifying and Addressing Trauma Across Three Aspects of the Academic Environment

Wednesday, November 3 (1:05-1:35) via Zoom

Traumatization is not limited to one-off events nor are the same circumstances or events traumatic for every person. Recognizing the role of diversity in traumatization, as well as the diversity of trauma itself, can help us create better educational environments for our students, our peers, and ourselves. This session will focus on examining the environmental roots of trauma and considering ways that educators can address these diverse factors at the university, departmental, and classroom levels in more equitable ways.

Register Online


PAST Micro-workshops - this document provides information about previous micro-workshops.