News

Sparking an Interest in STEM (DU Magazine, Fall 2019)

Achievements by Women in Science at Duquesne (2019)

Jelena Janjic, Associate Professor of Pharmacy, and her research team move closer to producing pain nanomedicine. Dr. Janjic's team used industry-accepted, quality-by-design standards, which is not typically done with nanotechnology.

Michelle Valkanas, a doctoral program student in Department of Biological Sciences, Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, is awarded an On To the Future Grant through the Geological Society of America to attend their National Conference this Fall. The Grant provides full admission to the conference, $600 for travel, and a one-day career development workshop.

Heather Allen, doctoral program student in Department of Biological Sciences, Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, received a Ruth L Kirschtein National Research Service Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to support her thesis work investigating cell-type specific contributions to bladder pain modulation in the amygdala.

Charlotte Hacker, doctoral program student in Department of Biological Sciences, Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, received a Fulbright Scholarship to study snow leopards on the Tibetan Plateau in China. Her research will focus on snow leopard diet, with emphasis on understanding livestock depredation and how this knowledge can be used to to find appropriate solutions for human-wildlife conflict.

Rachel Miller Neilan, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts, is awarded the inaugural 2019 John G. Rangos Prizes for Faculty and Students for her proposal, Solving Real-World Problems Using Agent-Based Modeling.

Richard Simpson, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, Regina Harbourne, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy, and Patrick Cooper, Assistant Professor of Physics, are awarded the inaugural 2019 John G. Rangos Prizes for Faculty and Students for their proposal, A Mobile Clinic and Makerspace.

Elena Donoso Brown, Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy, and Sarah Wallace, Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology, with Occupational Therapy students Natalie Falcione, Jenna Gallipoli, Fiona Kessler and Rachel Tokarski, are awarded the inaugural 2019 John G. Rangos Prizes for Faculty and Students for their proposal, Interprofessional Collaboration 101: Preparing Students to Reimagine Health Care.

Cathleen Appelt, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Meghan Blakowitz, Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy, Ann Stuart, Clinical Assistant Professor in Occupational Therapy, Bridget Calhoun, Associate Professor in Physician Assistant Studies, Jordan Covvey Assistant Professor in Pharmacy, Jessica Devido, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Tammy Hughes, Professor in Education, Rachel Kallem Whitman, Adjunct Faculty of Psychology, Andrew Simpson, Assistant Professor in History, and Tiffany Sizemore, Assistant Professor in Law, are awarded the inaugural 2019 John G. Rangos Prizes for Faculty and Students for their proposal, Innovating Solutions to Contemporary Mental Health Challenges and Social Injustice.

Rachael Neilan, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts, and Benedict Kolber, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, BSNES, $310,500, from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, for research.

Nancy Trun, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences, BSNES, a $7,500 Faculty Development Fund Award, for Identification of the Roles for Bacteria in Passive Remediation of Abandoned Coal Mine Drainage.

Elena Donoso Brown, Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy, Rangos School of Health Sciences, an $8,113 Faculty Development Fund Award, for Improving Home Program Practice for People with Language Disorders After Stroke.

Kelley Baumgartel, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, a $10,000 Faculty Development Fund Award, for Human Milk Macronutrient Variability and Subsequent Preterm Infant Growth.

Melikhan Tanyeri, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, a $7,576 Faculty Development Fund Award, for Teaching Key Engineering Concepts Through Music.

Dr. Anna Haensch, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, was recently named US Junior Oberwolfach Fellow.

Dr. Sarah Woodley, Associate Professor of Biology, was awarded the 2019 Carnegie Science Award in the Postsecondary Educator category from the Carnegie Science Center. Carnegie Science Awards honor the accomplishments of innovators in the fields of science, technology and education whose contributions lead to significant economic or societal benefits for the western Pennsylvania region.

Dr. Rehana Leak, Associate Professor of Pharmacology, received a $13,513 grant from the American Heart Association (passed through the University of Pittsburgh) for the project Dopamine Systems and Rehabilitation Treatments for Improving Neurorecovery Among Cardiac Arrest Survivors.

Dr. Rehana Leak, Associate Professor of Pharmacology, received a pair of grants from the National Institutes of Health. A $233,752 grant for the project The Impact of Heat Shock Protein 70 on Lewy Body Disorders, and a $12,135 subaward from the University of Pittsburgh for the project Dopamine System Focused Neurorehabilitation Model for Improving Neurorecovery Among Cardiac Arrest Survivors.

Dr. Jelena Janjic, Associate Professor of Pharmacy, spoke about her work using nanotechnology to develop medicines to treat chronic pain at the TEDxCMU Conference Saturday, March 30, 2019.