Faculty Opportunities

Check below to learn about past offerings for faculty.

Teaching Writing Online
Wednesday, February 10, 2021, 2-3 p.m.
The shift to hyflex and online teaching has brought questions about how to teach writing in a wholly or partially virtual environment. This workshop will provide faculty and teaching assistants with practical tips and proven strategies. Attendees will leave with ideas for assigning, assessing, and instructing writing online. While instructors of writing-intensive courses will find the workshop especially valuable, all instructors incorporating writing into their courses are welcome.

Write a Valentine Event
Friday, February 14, through Wednesday, February 19th during open hours
Location: College Hall 216
Join the Writing Center in celebrating the holiday of love by writing your own valentines to your favrorite mark of punctuation, word, or book. There will be free candy and those who complete a valentine will be entered to win a prize

Strategies for Responding to Student Writing
Tuesday, February 18, 12:15-1:30 p.m.
Location: Union 109
This workshop will share strategies for responding to student writing to encourage them to revise. The session will address tips for using comments to teach students rather than just to justify a grade. Faculty and teaching assistants will learn about giving comments a future orientation, using minimal marking, and asking students to respond to comments. Taken together, these approaches offer ways to help students take responsibility for their learning.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Teaching the New APA 7th Edition Citation Style
Wednesday, March 11, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
Location: Union 109
Thursday, March 12, 12:15-1:15 p.m.
Location: Union 119
In late Fall 2019, the American Psychological Association published the 7th edition of the APA Handbook, which includes revisions to its citation style. This workshop will acquaint faculty and teaching assistants with the major changes and offer tips for teaching the logic of source documentation behind the updates. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions.

Cross-Campus Perspectives on Teaching Writing-Intensive Courses With Elaine Abbott, Elena Donoso Brown, Kristin Klucevsek, Benjamin Goldschmidt, and Sandra Quiones
Thursday, March 28, 2019, 12:15-1:30 p.m.
Location: 715 Fisher Hall
Instructors in writing-intensive courses (WICS) often have questions about how to approach writing instruction. At this workshop, participants will learn strategies from panelists across campus who have successfully taught WICs. Panelists include faculty from the Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, the Rangos School of  Health Sciences, the School of Education, the McAnulty College of Liberal Arts, and the Pappert School of Music. After a review of the current WIC requirements and some general guidance regarding best practices for teaching such courses, panelists will share tips for teaching a WIC in their respective disciplines. They will also share specific assignments that have been effective and discuss how they communicate the value of WICs to their students. Attendees will have time at the end of the session to ask the panelists questions.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence

Writing Prompts that Work: A Workshop in Crafting Effective Assignment Sheets for Writing Projects
Monday, February 4, 2019, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
Location: 715 Fisher Hall
Tuesday, February 5, 2019,11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Location: 715 Fisher Hall
Do you have questions about how your students will (mis)understand your writing prompt or assignment sheet? Come to this hands-on session where the Writing Center Director and consultants will be available to meet with faculty and teaching assistants individually or in small groups to answer questions, point out areas where students might be confused, and offer suggestions for presenting writing tasks in ways to maximize student comprehension and performance.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence

Approaches to Peer Writing Workshops
October 2, 2018, 12:15-1:30 p.m.
Location: 119 Union
An increasingly common and potentially effective way to promote process writing as well as to improve student writing is to conduct peer workshops. Sometimes, however, teachers and students worry about the logistics of conducting such workshops as well as quality of the feedback students provide their peers. This workshop will explain how to address this and other potential challenges of peer writing workshops, possible benefits of them, reasons to use them, and ways to integrate them into courses. Faculty and teaching assistants will learn different models for peer workshopping activities and strategies to encourage productive student feedback.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence

Teaching the Digital Humanities
Friday, September 21, 2018, 11:00-1:00 p.m.
Location: Africa Room, Student Union
The digital humanities has gained visibility in the last several years in the academy and beyond. But what is it? And what does it mean to teach in/with/for it? In response to these questions, come hear panelists discuss approaches to digital humanities pedagogy. Panelists include Dr. Michelle Brock from the Department of History at Washington & Lee University; Dr. Alison Langmead, the Director of the Visual Media Workshop at the University of Pittsburgh; and Dr. James P. Purdy from the Department of English at Duquesne.
Co-sponsored by the Department of History, the Department of English, and the Center for Teaching Excellence

https://duq.edu/about/centers-and-institutes/center-for-teaching-excellence/teaching-the-digital-humanities

Writing Prompts that Work: A Workshop in Crafting Effective Assignment Sheets for Writing Projects
Tuesday, September 11, 2018, 11:00-11:30 a.m.
Location: 314 Canevin Hall
Wednesday, September 12, 2018, 3:00-3:30 p.m.
Location: 727 Fisher Hall
Do you have questions about how your students will (mis)understand your writing prompt or assignment sheet? Come to this hands-on session where the Writing Center Director and consultants will be available to meet with faculty and teaching assistants individually or in small groups to answer questions, point out areas where students might be confused, and offer suggestions for presenting writing tasks in ways to maximize student comprehension and performance.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence

What Are Writing-Intensive Courses? (with Jerry Stinnett)
Monday, April 9, 2018, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Location: 613 Union
This workshop will educate instructors about the value and purpose of writing-intensive courses (WICs) and address myths about what it means to teach them. Faculty and graduate students will learn the rationale behind WICs and the criteria that make a course writing-intensive, what constitutes writing instruction and writing feedback in a WIC, as well as what support is available for WIC instructors.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence, the First-Year Writing Program, and the CORE Curriculum.

(How) Should We Teach Grammar?: Strategies for Responding to Sentence-Level Writing Mistakes
Monday, February 26, 2018, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
Location: 727 Fisher Hall
Concern and frustration over students' grammar errors seem to be ever-present-and recurring-elements of teaching and grading writing. What is an instructor to do? This workshop, co-sponsored by the University Writing Center and CTE, will briefly point to some scholarship that provides useful frameworks to help understand students' sentence-level writing errors. Then it will offer techniques for responding to these mistakes that promote student learning over teacher editing. Faculty and graduate students will learn strategies they can apply to their classroom instruction and writing feedback.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Three Ways to Incorporate the Writing Center into Your Teaching, Or How to Get the Most out of the Writing Center as an Instructor
Wednesday, January 31, 12:00-12:30 p.m.
This mini-workshop will share with instructors strategies for using the Writing Center in class. Faculty and graduate students will leave with ideas for three ways to incorporate the Writing Center into their teaching beyond just a blurb on their syllabus. It will also include a demonstration to show what happens during consulting sessions.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Please visit the following link to view a recording of the workshop:

https://edtech.msl.duq.edu/Mediasite/Play/f1f97e1eb4454587a498f868bee9f7091d?catalog=f4a2a3e9-90f3-464e-8f1e-cfdacb822db2

Writing and Information Literacy Frameworks: Intersections for Lifelong Learning (with Marcia Rapchak)
Tuesday, October 31, 2017, 12:15-1:30 p.m.
Location: 301 Canevin Hall
This workshop will introduce faculty and graduate students to the Framework for Success in Postsecondary Writing (published by the Council of Writing Program Administrators, National Council of Teachers of English, and National Writing Project) and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (published by the Association of College and Research Libraries). The session will highlight connections between these Framework documents to provide ideas for faculty and graduate students to frame writing and research activities in any course across campus.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence and Gumberg Library.

Writing to Learn: Activities for Working with ESL Students at Duquesne University (with Julia Salehzadeh, Janine Carlock, Jerry Stinnett)
Wednesday, October 25, 2017
Location: 109 Union
This session is designed to help instructors increase their knowledge and effectiveness in using writing to learn activities when teaching students for whom English is a second language. Faculty and staff from the ESL Program and the Writing Center will facilitate a discussion to provide information about these students and the resources available to them. Participants will leave with practical strategies for engaging with and improving the educational experience of ESL and non-ESL students alike. Participants are asked to complete a brief pre-workshop questionnaire.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence and the ESL Department.

Open House
Friday, September 8, 2017, 11:30-12:00 p.m.
Location: 408 Gumberg
Faculty, graduate students, and staff are invited to attend this open house to learn more about the University Writing Center and its resources available to support instructors and writers across campus. The open house will feature a consulting session demonstration to show what happens when students visit the Writing Center for help with their writing. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask the Director questions, meet members of the staff, and pick up resources.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Three Ways to Incorporate the Writing Center into Your Teaching, Or How to Get the Most out of the Writing Center as an Instructor
Friday, September 8, 2017, 11:00-11:30 a.m.
Location: 408 Gumberg
This mini-workshop will share with instructors strategies for using the Writing Center in class. Faculty and graduate students will leave with ideas for three ways to incorporate the Writing Center into their teaching beyond just a blurb on their syllabus.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence

Teaching a Writing-Intensive Course the Easy Way (Dr. James P. Purdy, English and Writing Center, and Dr. Jerry Stinnett, English and First-Year Writing)
Tuesday, April 11, 2017, 12:15-1:30 p.m.
Location: 613 Union
Are you teaching a Writing-Intensive Course and worry about taking time away from material you need to cover in order to teach writing? Does it seem like students should have already learned how to write by the time they reach your class? Or perhaps you feel unqualified to teach writing? Are you wondering how you will be able to grade additional writing assignments? These are good questions that many writing-intensive course instructors have. Many, however, are borne of misunderstandings of what writing-intensive courses are supposed to be about. At this workshop, faculty and graduate students will learn ways to make writing-intensive course instruction easier and how it can supplement-and even improve-student acquisition of course material-all while not requiring you to stop your class to teach grammar.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Responding to Five Common Student Writing Struggles
Tuesday, March 14, 2017, 12:15-1:30 p.m.
Location: 613 Union
Students sometimes face challenges meeting the expectations surrounding five elements of college-level writing: thesis statements, conclusions, paragraph organization, transitions, and source integration. This workshop will review conventionally effective characteristics of each of these elements and offer participants responses to help students work to meet these conventions. Faculty and graduate students will get practice responding to sample student writing excerpts and will leave with teaching strategies and activities they can apply in the classroom.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Better Business Communication
Tuesday, November 29, 2016 10:30-11:30 a.m.
This workshop will focus on proper, written University communications and help identify proper communication methods, whether electronic or in written form. Attendees will learn how to recognize rhetorical elements that drive business writing decisions, discover conventions for writing to internal and external audiences, and determine which medium (print, digital, oral) to use for different business communication tasks. Participants will also leave with proofreading tips and guidelines for appropriate email and social media etiquette.
Co-sponsored by Human Resources

Planning a Writing-Intensive Course
Thursday, November 10, 2016 10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
One of the biggest challenges of teaching a writing-intensive course is incorporating the writing assignments/projects into the syllabus. When should due dates fall? How can the syllabus reflect the scaffolding of activities the lead to a writing project? How can writing activities fit in with all the content to be covered? This hands-on workshop will guide participants in planning the syllabus for a Spring 2017 writing-intensive course. Faculty and graduate students will leave with an outline of the schedule of writing projects and tasks. If you teach a University-designated "W" course, you will find this workshop especially useful as you prepare your new syllabus.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Creating Plagiarism-Resistant Assignments (with Dr. Jerry Stinnett)
Monday, October 3, 2016, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
In the copy and paste culture of today's students, plagiarism is a recurring problem for higher education. However, faculty can minimize the risk of plagiarism through the design of their assignments. In this workshop, faculty will learn strategies to create research and writing assignments that are resistant to plagiarism.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Teaching the New MLA Citation Style
Monday, September 12, 2016, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
Location: 608 Union
In late Spring 2016, the Modern Language Association published its 8th edition of the MLA Handbook with significant revisions to its citation style. This workshop will acquaint faculty and teaching assistants with the major changes and offer tips for teaching the logic of source documentation behind the updates. Attendees will have an opportunity to ask questions.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Planning a Writing-Intensive Course
Thursday, November 14, 2016 1:45- 3:00 p.m.
One of the biggest challenges of teaching a writing-intensive course is incorporating the writing assignments/projects into the syllabus. When should due dates fall? How can the syllabus reflect the scaffolding of activities the lead to a writing project? How can writing activities fit in with all the content to be covered? This hands-on workshop will guide participants in planning the syllabus for a Spring 2017 writing-intensive course. Faculty and graduate students will leave with an outline of the schedule of writing projects and tasks. If you teach a University-designated "W" course, you will find this workshop especially useful as you prepare your new syllabus.
Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Five Writing Activities for Any Day
February 4, 2016, 1:45-3:00 p.m.

Knowing what writing activities to use in class can be a challenge both pedagogically and logistically. What will help students most effectively learn material? What can serve as a productive task for the last ten minutes of class? Operating from the premise that writing facilitates learning, this workshop will describe five in-class writing activities and associated learning goals that new and experienced teachers can incorporate into classes from any discipline or level. Faculty and graduate students will leave with ideas for writing tasks that they can implement in the classroom.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

Responding to Five Common Student Writing Struggles

Tuesday, September 29, 2015, 12:15-1:30 p.m.

Students sometimes face challenges meeting the expectations surrounding five elements of college-level writing: thesis statements, conclusions, paragraph organization, transitions, and source integration. This workshop will review conventionally effective characteristics of each of these elements and offer participants responses to help students work to meet these conventions. Faculty and graduate students will get practice responding to sample student writing excerpts and will leave with teaching strategies and activities they can apply in the classroom.

Approaches to Peer Writing Workshops

Thursday, February 26, 2015, 10:45-noon

An increasingly common and potentially effective way to promote process writing is to conduct peer workshops. Sometimes, however, teachers and students worry about the quality of the feedback students provide their peers. This workshop will explain how to address this and other potential challenges of peer writing workshops, possible benefits of them, reasons to use them, and ways to integrate them into courses. Faculty and teaching assistants will learn different models for peer workshopping activities and strategies to encourage productive student feedback.

Planning a Writing-Intensive Course

Thursday, April 16, 2015, 12:15-1:30 p.m.

One of the biggest challenges of teaching a writing-intensive course is incorporating the writing assignments/projects into the syllabus. When should due dates fall? How can the syllabus reflect the scaffolding of activities the lead to a writing project? How can writing activities fit in with all the content to be covered? This hands-on workshop will guide participants in planning the syllabus for a Fall 2015 writing-intensive course. Faculty and graduate students will leave with an outline of the schedule of writing projects and tasks. If you teach a University-designated "W" course, you will find this workshop especially useful as you prepare your new syllabus.

Designing Effective Writing Projects

Wednesday, September 17, 2014, 12:00-1:30 p.m., 613 Union

Have students ever been confused by a writing assignment you thought was clear? Have you ever received from students responses to a writing assignment that did not match what you thought you assigned or what you expected? Good assignment design helps you lessen student confusion and receive the writing projects you intend. This workshop will provide participants with tips for creating clear, productive writing assignments. Faculty and graduate students will learn instructional verbs to use when assigning particular writing tasks, design suggestions for chunking information for today's students, and approaches to scaffolding/breaking down projects. Participants are welcome to bring drafts of assignments to workshop. If you assign writing tasks in your course, whether it is a University-designated "W" course or not, this workshop is for you!

Grading Writing to Encourage Revision

Thursday, February 27, 2014, 12:15-1:30 p.m., 608 Union

Wednesday November 20, 2013, 12:00-1:00 p.m. -- RESCHEDULED to Spring 2014
SLPA Webinar

This workshop will provide strategies for grading writing to encourage students to revise. The session will address tips for using comments to teach students rather than to justify a grade. Faculty and teaching assistants will learn about giving comments a future orientation, using minimal marking, and asking students to respond to comments. Taken together, these approaches offer ways to help students take responsibility for their learning.

Five Writing Activities for Any Day

Tuesday, October 22, 2013, 1:45-3:00 p.m.
108 Canevin

Knowing what writing activities to use in class can be a challenge both pedagogically and logistically. What will help students most effectively learn material? What can serve as a productive task for the last ten minutes of class? Operating from the premise that writing facilitates learning, this workshop will describe five in-class writing activities and associated learning goals that new and experienced teachers can incorporate into classes from any discipline or level. Faculty and graduate students will leave with ideas for writing tasks that they can implement in the classroom. They are also welcome to bring their own ideas to share.

Plagiarism Resistant Assignments and Tools for Promoting Academic Integrity
Presenters: James Purdy (Writing Center and English) and Dana Oliver (Educational Technology)

Date: Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013, 12:00 - 1:30 p.m.
613 Union

In the copy and paste culture of today's students, plagiarism is a recurring problem for higher education. However, faculty can minimize the risk of plagiarism through the design of their assignments and the strategic use of SafeAssign to help students monitor their use of sources. In this workshop, faculty will learn strategies to create research and writing assignments that are resistant to plagiarism. They will also learn about the Blackboard's SafeAssign tool as a way to encourage academic integrity among their students.

Planning a Writing-Intensive Course

Thursday, November 12, 2015, 12:15-1:30 p.m.

Thursday, November 6, 2014, 12:15-1:30 p.m., 109 Union

Thursday, April 10, 2014, 12:15-1:30 p.m., 608 Union

Tuesday, December 3, 2013, 1:45-3:00 p.m., 108 Canevin

Thursday, April 11, 2013, 12:15 - 1:30 p.m., 613 Union

Wednesday, November 7, 2012, 11:00-12:00 p.m., 643 College Hall

Wednesday, December 7, 2011, 1:00-2:00 p.m., 643 College Hall

One of the biggest challenges of teaching a writing-intensive course is incorporating the writing assignments/projects into the syllabus. When should due dates fall? How can the syllabus reflect the scaffolding of activities the lead to a writing project? How can writing activities fit in with all the content to be covered? This hands-on workshop will guide participants in planning the syllabus for a writing-intensive course. Faculty and graduate students will leave with an outline of the schedule of writing projects and tasks.If you teach a University-designated "W" course, you will find this workshop especially useful as you prepare your new syllabus.

(How) Should We Teach Grammar?: Strategies for Responding to Sentence-Level Writing Mistakes

Wednesday, September 19, 2012, 12:00-1:30 p.m.
505/506 Rockwell Hall

Concern and frustration over students' grammar errors seem to be ever-present-and recurring-elements of teaching and grading writing. What is an instructor to do? This workshop, co-sponsored by the University Writing Center and CTE, will briefly point to some scholarship that provides useful frameworks to help understand students' sentence-level writing errors. Then it will offer techniques for responding to these mistakes that promote student learning over teacher editing. Faculty and graduate students will learn strategies they can apply to their classroom instruction and writing feedback.

Five Writing Activities for Any Day

Tuesday, September 20, 2012, 1:45-3:00 p.m.
119 Union

Knowing what writing activities to use in class can be a challenge both pedagogically and logistically. What will help students most effectively learn material? What can serve as a productive task for the last ten minutes of class? Operating from the premise that writing facilitates learning, this workshop will describe five in-class writing activities and associated learning goals that new and experienced teachers can incorporate into classes from any discipline or level. Faculty and graduate students will leave with ideas for writing tasks that they can implement in the classroom. They are also welcome to bring their own ideas to share.

Strategies for Responding to Student Writing

Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 3:00-4:30 p.m.
109 Union

Responding to student writing is sometimes one of the most overwhelming -and time consuming- aspects of teaching writing. This workshop, co-sponsored by CTE, will address methods for efficiently and effectively providing productive written feedback on student writing. Faculty and graduate students will learn ways to offer revision suggestions students are more likely to take and to guide students in assuming responsibility for their writing choices. They will also learn strategies for offering feedback without spending too much time on each paper.

Effective Approaches to Peer Writing Workshops

Tuesday, September 28, 2010, 1:45 - 3:00 p.m.
505/506 Rockwell

An increasingly common and effective way to promote process writing is to conduct peer workshops. Sometimes, however, teachers and students worry about the quality of the feedback students provide one another. This workshop will explain the benefits of peer workshops (despite the potential for imperfect feedback), reasons to use them, and ways to integrate them into courses. Faculty and teaching assistants will learn different models for peer workshopping activities and strategies to encourage productive student feedback and, ultimately, stronger writing.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.

A Prezi from the workshop is available for viewing.

Perspectives on Preparing Undergraduates for Research and Publishing

Panelists:  Norm Conti (Sociology), Steve Hansen (CTE & OSL), Patrick Miller (Philosophy), Jim Purdy (English & Writing Center), Diana Sasso (Library), Sarah Woodley (Biological Sciences)
Monday, October 4, 2010, 1:45 - 3:00 p.m.
505/506 Rockwell

Many of Duquesne's undergraduates have the potential to present and publish their scholarship with advice and encouragement from faculty and the readily available research and writing support offered by Gumberg Library and the Writing Center. Panelists will offer strategies for guiding undergraduate students wishing to conduct research for publication and presentation.

Co-sponsored by Gumberg Library, Center for Teaching Excellence, and Office of Research

Wikipedia is Good for You!: Using Wikipedia to Teach Research-based Writing

Thursday, February 18, 2010, 3 - 4:15 p.m.
505/506 Rockwell Hall

A frequent top result of Google searches, Wikipedia is often used by students for research-based writing in college courses.  The problems of this approach are well-documented and have led some instructors to forbid its use.  This workshop will call for another approach by exploring ways to use Wikipedia to teach students productive composing practices.  Faculty and teaching assistants will learn about using components of the Wikipedia interface to model effective research-based scholarly writing, incorporating Wikipedia into research projects, and designing assignments that ask students to contribute to Wikipedia.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Teaching Excellence.